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It is popular with the locals and surrounding areas - so bookings on Friday and Saturday nights is advisable I would even go as far as recommending this restaurant for an award. Highly recommended! Flights Vacation Rentals Restaurants Things to do. Skip to main content. Log in to get trip updates and message other travelers. Gasthaus-Restaurant Ambros, Bettingen. See all restaurants in Bettingen. Gasthaus-Restaurant Ambros Claimed. All photos Ratings and reviews 4. View all details meals, features.

Location and contact Maximinstr. Is this restaurant good for brunch? Yes No Unsure. Is this restaurant good for local cuisine? Is this restaurant a hidden gem or off-the-beaten path? Is this a Greek restaurant? Is this a diner? Is this a seafood restaurant?

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Very good 1. Average 0. Poor 1. Terrible 0. Traveler type. Time of year. Language English. All languages. English 4. German He had made for himself a most creditable position in financial circles, enjoying an unassailable reputation for business integrity as well as enterprise.

On the 28th of March, , Mr. Bolton was united in marriage to Miss Nellie J. French and they became the parents of two daughters: Carmel French, who is now the wife of Frank A. Ryder of Portland: and Nonearle French, who is at home with her mother.

Bolton was always keenly interested in public affairs at The Dalles and recognition of his public spirit and his devotion to the general good was manifest in his election to the mayoralty. He belonged to the Masonic fraternity of which he was an exemplary representative and his entire life was characterized by those qualities which in every land and clime awaken confidence and respect. His widow is now living at Alexandra Court, in Portland and is well known in the best circles of the Rose City.

Married June 25, , to Agnes L. Educated at the common schools of Lafayette, Ore. Louis, Mo. Admitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon in Practiced law in Yamhill County until , when he removed to The Dalles and practiced his profession until May , when he was appointed Judge of Seventh Judicial District of Oregon, and has served ever since.

Member K. Thirty-six years of his life have been spent in Wasco county, which numbers him among its foremost agriculturists, and his activities have also been of benefit to The Dalles. There were seven children in the family, and Thomas Brogan is the only one now living. He was reared on his father's farm and received a limited education. Leaving home when a boy of twelve, he came to the United States alone in and obtained work in the coal mines of Pennsylvania. In he went to Liverpool, England, and for six months was on a sailing vessel bound for Australia.

He landed in Melbourne, but soon after made the voyage to New Zealand, and was there engaged in mining for five years, developing a claim which yielded considerable gold. Brogan then returned to Australia and devoted his attention to the sheep and cattle business. He also took contracts for the construction of buildings and roads and prospered in all of his ventures. In he disposed of his business in Australia and returned to the United States, identifying his interests with those of the Pacific northwest.

He purchased a large ranch in Wasco county and devoted his energies to the cultivation of the soil and the raising of livestock. Success attended his well directed labors and from time to time he increased his holdings, which now comprise sixteen thousand acres of land in Wasco county.

He is the largest individual landowner in the county, and runs about four thousand head of sheep and a large band of cattle, but the management of the place is now intrusted to his son, John Brogan. The father's various ranches are improved with good buildings and contain sixty-seven miles of fencing.

The work is facilitated by modern equipment and the most advanced methods are utilized in cultivating the land and caring for the stock. Brogan puts up six hundred tons of hay and alfalfa each year, and all of the grain and hay grown on the land is fed to the stock.

In he moved to The Dalles, purchasing a desirable home on Webster street, and also owns several lots in the city. He is the largest stockholder of the Citizens National Bank of The Dalles, of which he was one of the organizers, but has steadfastly refused to become an officer of the institution, feeling that the preference should be given to a younger man.

Collopy, who was born in that country. Her parents, William and Elizabeth O'Brien Collopy, were natives of Ireland and became pioneer settlers of New Zealand, in which they spent the remainder of their lives. The father followed agricultural pursuits and was a prosperous stock raiser. Collopy were born twelve children and three are now living: Bridget M. Brogan became the parents of twelve children, six of whom survive.

Mary was born in New Zealand and has remained at home. Bridget, also a native of New Zealand, became the wife of J. Robinson and has a daughter, Lillian, who is now Mrs. Ned Wyke of Portland, Oregon. John was born in New Zealand, and resides in Antelope, Oregon. Susan is likewise a native of New Zealand, and has become the wife of Frank Weiss. Katherine was born in Wasco county, and is part owner of a greenhouse at The Dalles.

Frances Grace, also a native of Wasco county, is now Mrs. John Becker. She resides in Woodburn and is the mother of one child, Thomas Joseph Becker. For more than a half century Mr. Brogan have journeyed together through life and in they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary.

On that happy occasion a banquet was held at Hotel Dalles and there Mr. Brogan entertained about forty friends, from whom they received many beautiful gifts as well as congratulations. Among the treasured possessions of Mr. Brogan is a rare onyx clock, tendered him by the premier of New Zealand and several of his most intimate friends at the time of his departure for the United States.

Brogan exercises his right of franchise in support of the candidates and tenets of the republican party, and his public spirit has been demonstrated by effective work in behalf of good roads and schools. His has been a picturesque career, replete with interesting experiences. He enjoys life and is esteemed for the qualities to which he owes his success. In May, , Mr. Brogan with Katherine and Frances, took a trip to Ireland, revisiting the old home. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Browne, Dr.

He is now a successful chiropractor of The Dalles, where he is accorded a liberal patronage. His parents were Christopher C. The Brownes were of old Pennsylvania stock and the great-grandfather of the Doctor became a pioneer of Missouri. The Mason family came from New England ancestry and were pioneers of Indiana. Christopher C. Browne removed with his family to Oregon when his son Daniel was but a small boy and settled in Salem.

The latter acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of Salem and afterward pursued an academic course at Dallas, while his professional training was received in the Pacific Chiropractic College at Portland. Following his graduation he took up active professional work in that city and there remained from until During his stay in Portland he was for three years secretary of the Oregon Chiropractic Association and published a magazine called The Drugless Review, devoted to the school of healing which he represents.

He was one of a committee appointed to draft a bill legalizing the practice of chiropractic, which was passed by the legislature in His work in that connection required so much of his time that he was forced to permit The Drugless Review to die just as it was getting on a paying basis.

This unselfishness on his part is but an index of the character of the man. In Dr. Ingram, who had built up an extensive business in The Dalles, invited Dr. Browne was united in marriage to Miss Almona R. Daniels, a daughter of Francis M. Daniels, who was a merchant. They have one child, Elizabeth, a student in the Junior high school in The Dalles.

Fraternally Dr. Browne is connected with the Elks and with the Knights of Pythias. He holds to the higest standards in his profession and his ability and enterprise have brought him prominently to the front. Robert R. Butler, a member of one of the leading law firms of The Dalles, has become well known through his service as circuit judge, as state senator, and as one of the political leaders of Oregon.

He was born September 24, , in Johnson county, Tennessee, and is a son of Dr. William H. One of Mr. Butler's ancestors figured prominently in events which shaped the early history of Johnson county and the town of Butler was named in his honor.

Colonel Roderick Randon Butler, the father of Dr. William R. Grayson, the maternal grandfather of Robert H. Butler, was also a gallant officer in the Union army and rose to the rank of colonel. Butler received the M. He is a physician of high standing and draws his patients from a wide area.

To Dr. Butler were born ten children: Mrs. Baker, who lives in the state of Washington; Robert R. Sproles, who resides in North Carolina; C. James Rivers, of North Carolina. Butler was reared in the town of Butler, which has been the home of the family for generations, and supplemented his public school training by attendance at the Holly Spring College.

He received the degree of LL. For three years he followed his profession at Mountain City, Tennessee, and in came to Oregon, locating in Condon, Gilliam county, where he practiced for five years. His legal acumen led to his election to the bench and during and he was circuit judge of Sherman, Wheeler and Gilliam counties.

To each case brought before his tribunal he gave deep thought and study and the justice of his rulings proved his moral worth. As mayor of Condon he also made an excellent record and since has been a resident of The Dalles. He has a comprehensive knowledge of law and displays marked skill in its exposition.

In he formed a partnership with Samuel E. Van Vactor, who is the senior member of the firm, and a large and important clientele denotes the confidence reposed in their ability as advocates and counselors. Butler was married in and has a daughter, Elizabeth Annabel. She was born at The Dalles, June 30, , and is attending St. Helen's Hall in Portland, Oregon. A power in the ranks of the republican party, Mr. Butler was chosen presidential elector-at-large and in was made messenger to Washington, D.

In he was elected state senator without opposition and from until was a member of that law-making body. In he again became presidential elector for Oregon and in was recalled to the office of state senator. He served from until and exerted his influence in behalf of all constructive legislation.

Butler is a Kiwanian and a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. His well developed powers have brought him to the front in his profession and the firmness, frankness and strength of his character have established him high in public regard. His paternal grandfather was a native of Virginia and the family were among the early pioneers of Illinois. The Coy family was of Quaker stock and numbered among the earliest residents of Pennsylvania. In Polk Butler removed with his family to Oregon, settling at Dufur, Wasco county, at which time Roy was a lad of but four years.

He acquired his education in the graded schools of Dufur and in the high school at The Dalles. When quite young he entered into the mercantile business as a clerk in a general store at Boyd, Wasco county, and afterward turned his attention to ranching on Eight Mile creek, where he secured four hundred and forty acres, on which he planted an orchard and also engaged in raising cattle for the next ten years.

He likewise became interested in the mercantile business at Boyd during the same period. Butler was elected to the office of county commissioner and occupied that position for four years. In the meantime he took up his residence at The Dalles and upon the expiration of his term as commissioner he established the insurance agency which he still conducts.

He is the representative of the Oregon Fire Relief Association for the district which embraces the counties of Morrow, Gilliam, Wasco, Hood River and Sherman and has placed his company upon a sound basis in this territory, having developed a business of gratifying and substantial proportions. Butler was married to Miss Ethel Southern, a daughter of C. Southern, a pioneer farmer of Wasco county. They have two children: Melva May and Roy Dale, both high school pupils.

Butler has a sister, Mrs. Edward Griffin, of Wasco county, and two brothers: the Rev. Butler, a missionary in South Africa and E. Butler, living at The Dalles. Butler gives his political allegiance to the democratic party, yet he cannot be said to be a politician in the sense of office seeking. The only public office he has filled besides that of county commissioner was that of postmaster at Boyd. He is an active member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has filled all of the chairs in the local organization.

The Butler family has long been represented in Oregon, for Roy D. Butler is a nephew of Daniel Butler, who came to this state in the '40s and is frequently mentioned in history as one of the founders of the state and as a fearless Indian fighter. Under other conditions Roy D. Butler is just as loyal to the best interests of Oregon and is justly accounted one of the representative citizens of The Dalles. Collector of Internal Revenue for the District and State of Oregon, is one of those quiet, unassuming gentlemen, whom we sometimes meet in the walks of public life, and realize the fact that in his case at least the office has sought the man, not the man the office, as is too generally the case.

He is a native of Michigan and was born in He came to Oregon in and read law with Hon. Wilson, afterwards Representative in Congress from this State. He was admitted to the bar in and opened an office at Salem. He was a member of the House from Marion County in , and in was elected State Senator from the same county.

In he received the appointment of United States District Attorney. At the expiration of his term of service in this capacity in , owing to failing health, he removed to Eastern Washington Territory, and there engaged in the stock business until , when he moved to The Dalles, and, in partnership with Hon. Dunbar, resumed the practice of law. In he was elected Presidential Elector on the Republican ticket and was a participant in the memorable Electoral College of that year, when poor Cronin - peace to his ashes - was so prominent a factor, and when Oregon's vote elected President Hayes.

In May, , he received his present appointment. Cartwright is a gentleman who is highly esteemed by all who know him and is regarded as a man of sterling integrity. He is tall and spare built, smooth face, save the mustache, sharp features, clear peaceful eye, and black hair. He is a warm personal friend and one that never forgets a favor.

He is courteous, genial and generous. As a public officer, he is attentive and obliging and in every way efficient. Helm, of the M. Team] Cates, Daniel L. Conscientious and efficient, Daniel L. Cates has thoroughly demonstrated his worth as a public servant and for eleven years has been city recorder of The Dalles.

He is a loyal Oregonian and a member of one of the honored, pioneer families of the state. The following account of his career was written by Fred Lockley and published in the Oregon Journal under date of November 29, 'I was born in a log cabin on the Long Tom, near Starr's Point, in Benton county, May 7, ,' said Mr.

His father's name was Alexander Cates. His mother's maiden name was Nancy Phipps and she was also a Kentuckian. My father left the Blue Grass state in , when he was nineteen years of age, and went to Missouri with an uncle, John Newton. She was a daughter of Daniel Grice, who went from that state to Kentucky and later located in Linn county, Missouri.

Father and his brother-in-law, Daniel Grice, built houses. In those days all lumber, including the flooring, was dressed by hand. Father had taken up a place in Linn county and in addition to working at his trade, raised corn and tobacco. Flournoy and his relatives. They took the usual emigrant route during the first part of the trip and went by way of the cut-off to Fort Hall.

The Nemaha river was crossed on rafts built by members of the party and at Salt creek they were detained for two days. There were few accidents on the trip, though in the early part of it an exciting incident occurred in the Pawnee country.

One morning a man came riding toward them at top speed on a fine grey horse and warned them of Indians who had attacked a train in advance of them. Three parties of emigrants had left Missouri at about the same time, the Flournoy train, the one attacked by Indians and what was called the Ohio train. The last consisted of forty men without a woman or child among them. There were two Indians in sight in an elevated position, signaling to the band that led in the attack and informing them of the movements of the whites.

The Ohio train rushed in from the rear on horseback and soon reached the Indians. The wagons of the Flournoy train were placed in a double row and the party advanced as rapidly as possible. After robbing the women of their jewelry and taking as much food and clothing as they could lay hands on, the Indians escaped and no one was injured.

The Flournoy train followed the route to the crossing of the Portneuf, which runs into the Snake river, and then traveled to the south, crossing the Raft river. As they followed its course they came to that remarkable creation of nature, the Thousand Spring valley, containing those famous soda springs which vary in temperature from boiling hot to ice cold and which cover an area of several square miles.

Proceeding through what was afterwards called the Landers cut-off, they came out on the Green river and followed its course to St. Mary's river. After passing the three Humboldt lakes they 1 were warned by a note tacked up by the roadside of danger from Indians. Two men had been killed and a little farther on the body of an Indian was found lying in the road.

At the foot of the last lake two roads separate, one leading to the Carson river and the other to the Truckee river. The party followed the Truckee road and about September 17, , camped where the Donner party endured their sufferings and where some met their tragic deaths in They could see plainly where the trees had been cut down and limbs cut off of others ten or twelve feet above the ground, showing how deep the snow must have been when they camped on it.

Later he took up a claim on Poor Man creek, finding dirt which paid him thirty dollars a day with pick and pan. After working the claim for a month the heavy snow drove him out and he went back to Nevada City, where he spent the winter. Next spring he found a claim from which. In company with three other miners he engaged in prospecting on Kanaha creek. They struck a claim where they took out fifty dollars a day. As soon as their grub was gone they went back to Nevada City and brought out twelve hundred pounds of supplies on seven pack horses.

They found their claim had been jumped, so they struck out down the creek and struck another claim even richer than the first. On July 4, , the four of them took out over six hundred dollars. They averaged about one hundred dollars a day. My father's partners became dissatisfied and thought they could find a richer ground, so he bought them out and worked the claim until late in the fall of Downieville, the nearest post office, was twelve miles distant by mountain trail.

He worked on a hotel and was paid ten dollars a day. After the hotel was built he went to Sacramento and from there to San Francisco, where he bought a ticket for Panama. He had to pay sixteen dollars for the use of a mule to ride twenty-six miles across the isthmus to connect with a boat. After he had ridden about two-thirds of the way he overtook a miner, who offered him eight dollars for the use of the mule for the remaining eight miles, so father walked the rest of the way.

He had to pay a fare of ten dollars on a rowboat which took him to the Atlantic side of the isthmus. The natives were having a revolution and told the Californians to keep off the streets so they wouldn't get hurt. However, the Americans wanted to see what was going on, so one of them was killed, as well as a number of natives. The American consul sent out to the Cherokee and Ohio, which were anchored in the stream, and got a brass six-pounder and an iron cannon.

He put these so he could sweep the street and told the natives that if they fought any more or killed any more Americans he would turn the cannon loose, so they decided to quit fighting. He bought a steerage ticket for New York for fifty dollars.

The first cabin ticket was seventy-five dollars. After he got on the boat he paid the purser five dollars extra to sit at the first cabin table and have a cabin like the first class passengers. The Ohio was a sidewheeler and there were about two hundred returning gold miners aboard. At Havana they transferred to the Georgia for New Orleans. In the Crescent city he paid sixteen dollars for a ticket to St. Louis and made the trip of about twelve-hundred miles on the Patrick Henry.

At St. Louis he took passage on a small boat called the Lewis F. Linn, for Brunswick, the great tobacco trading point on the Missouri, traveling with Washington Leach, who had been his companion in the mines of California and on the returning sea voyage. At Brunswick he hired a rig to drive to Linneus, where he had left mother. When he arrived there he found that his father-in-law had sold out and that mother had gone to Jive with Uncle Newton.

He hired a man to drive him out to the Newton place. He bought a house and lot for three hundred dollars and got a job as carpenter at a dollar and a quarter a day. In the party were father's cousin, Ambrose Newton, who brought his wife and three children. He had two wagons, with four yoke of oxen to each, and was accompanied by three young men, who came along to work for their board.

Father had one wagon, three yoke of oxen and two cows. In his wagon were himself, mother, Sarah, the baby, and a young man named Washington Ward, who went along to work for his hoard. The members of the train chose father as their captain because of his previous experience in crossing the plains.

The emigrants drove to St. Joseph, Missouri, and thence up the river, which they crossed at Council Bluffs. They took the south side of the Platte. A large party of Pawnee Indians accompanied them almost to Ash Hollow. There my father and Mr.

Wiley went on a hunting expedition. Father killed a big buffalo and they loaded their horses with meat. When they were hunting a hail storm came up which was so severe that the cattle couldn't face it. They turned around and drifted with the storm. On the Bear river in Utah six saddle horses were stolen. Father lost a good horse. He said that when he and Fowler were looking for the horses they met an Indian on a cayuse,while his squaw was mounted on a big roan horse.

Father had a rifle with inlaid silver work and the Indian tried to take it. Father pulled out his Colt revolver and the Indian changed his mind, and the last father saw of him and the squaw they were making their horses go as fast as they could. The next day the party arrived at Steamboat Springs, where an Englishman had a trading station. After crossing the Malheur river they went down the Snake and struck Burnt river at a point where Huntington was afterward built.

They passed through the Powder River valley below the place where Baker City is now located and there father suffered from blood poisoning, which endangered his life. After coming into the Grande Ronde valley they passed Medical lake and in the Blue mountains stayed over night at Lee's encampment, now Bingham Springs.

Then they proceeded down the Wild Horse through what is now the Umatilla Indian reservation, finding Indians there who were raising corn and potatoes. After reaching Deschutes they made their way down Ten-Mile creek and thence to Tygh valley. They passed through the Barlow tollgate and down Laurel Hill, soon afterward coming to the Big Sandy valley. On September 9 they reached Foster's famous ranch and on the 11th crossed the Willamette at Portland on a capstan and two horses. In father and Fred Flora took a contract to get out timbers and build a barn for Captain Doty in Yamhill county.

Father next built a granary for Mr. McLeod on Tualatin plains. They paid him seven dollars a day and he took his pay in flour, which he sold in Portland. From Tualatin plains he moved to the Long Tom, in Beaten county, where he bought, for three hundred dollars, a quarter section. Forty acres of the tract had been fenced and there was a good house on the place.

Father bought a land entry of one hundred and sixty acres for one hundred and twenty dollars and took up the adjoining quarter section. The first loom on the Long Tom was constructed by father, who built it for Mrs. He was paid forty dollars for the job. Ferguson wove homespun cloth.

He bought a new wagon, a span of mules and ninety head of cattle. He hired John Florence to drive the stock over the Barlow trail to the Dennis Maloney place, near the present site of Dufur. Father traded our place to Mrs. Upton for two large mares, Pet and Pigeon. Afterward father moved to Eight-Mile creek, purchasing a farm from "Big Steve" Edwards, and there mother died in the fall of , leaving two sons and two daughters, one a baby less than a year old.

The hard winter of nearly wiped father off the map financially. He had only thirty head of stock left when the snow went off in the spring. Susan Griffin, my mother's sister, died shortly alter we children went there. Father and Fred Flora had started in the spring of with a herd of cattle for the Orofino mines in Idaho. My sister did the housework. When J. Broadwell bought the place my sister Sarah and I stayed with him for two years.

My brother Willie went to Idaho with my father, who purchased a mine in the Boise basin and later moved to Rocky Bar, in Alturas county, that state. He was absent two years and brought home fourteen hundred dollars. He built a mill on Fifteen-Mile creek near the Meadows, also owning a mill on the Columbia, opposite Wind river, and this he later sold to Joseph T.

While operating the plant he built a small steamboat to handle the lumber. After disposing of his mills father worked for a time at his trade and aided in constructing the shoe factory in North Dalles. In father married Mrs. Elizabeth Herbert, a widow, who had two children: Mrs. Jane Sherer, deceased; and George A. Herbert, now a resident of Baker, Oregon. The mother of these children passed away at The Dalles and father's death occurred at Cascade Locks, Oregon, in My sister Sarah, the oldest of the family, was born in Missouri in On May 10, , she became the wife of William Frizzell, and her demise occurred in at Cascade Locks.

My brother William was born in Benton county, Oregon, in and is now living in Oakland, California. I was the third child and my full name is Daniel Lycurgus Cates. My sister Susan was born February 14, , in Wasco county, Oregon. She became the wife of W. Wilson, a well known attorney of Portland, Oregon, and died February 14, Cates attended the public schools at The Dalles and one of his instructors was Professor S.

From until he was in the employ of his father, who at that time was operating a saw mill above Cascade Locks, where the town of Wyeth is now located. His lumber yard at The Dalles was managed by Daniel L. Cates, who afterward became a bookkeeper for John H. Larsen, a dealer in wool and hides. Cates remained until , when he was appointed a deputy under George Herbert, sheriff of Wasco county, and acted in that capacity for four years.

In he was elected sheriff and served for two years, thoroughly justifying the trust reposed in him. In August, , he located at Cascade Locks, opening a general store, which he conducted during the construction of the locks. About five hundred men were at work and in the locks were completed by J. At that time Mr. Cates disposed of the business and established a drug store, of which he was the proprietor for two years. Crossing the Columbia river, he purchased a tract of three hundred and twenty acres in Skamania county, Washington, and applied himself to the task of clearing the land.

He cut down the timber, which he sawed into logs, and disposed of them at a good figure. A few years later he sold the ranch and in November, , returned to The Dalles. Prosperity had attended his various undertakings and for a time he lived retired. In he was prevailed upon to reenter the arena of public affairs and has since been city recorder. His duties are discharged with characteristic thoroughness and fidelity and his continued retention in the office proves that his services are appreciated.

On October 9, , Mr. Cates is the ninth in line of descent from Jan Stryker, who was born in Holland in and emigrated from Ruinen, a village in the province of Drenthe, with his wife, two sons and four daughters, arriving at New Amsterdam in The mother of these children was Lambertje Seubering, who died several years after the family came to America.

She survived her husband, who was a man of prominence in colonial days. In he was elected chief magistrate of Midworet and according to the Colonial History of New York" he was a member of the embassy sent from New Amsterdam to the lord mayors in Holland. The history also states that he became a representative in the general assembly on April 10, , a member of the Hempstead convention of , and was commissioned captain of a military company on October 25, His brother, who also came to this country, was named Jacobus Garretsen Stryker.

Jan Stryker and his first wife had a large family. She died June 17, , and his demise occurred June 11, He was high sheriff of Kings county, Long Island; judge of the court from until , and was made captain of a foot company in On June 1, , he purchased four thousand acres of land on Millstone river in Somerset county, New Jersey. It does not appear that he ever lived on this property but his sons, Jacob and Barends, and his grandsons, the four sons of Jan, removed from Flatbush to New Jersey.

Pieter and Annetje Barends Stryker had eleven children. Jan Stryker, their third child, was born August 6, , and in married Margarita Schenck. She was baptized June 2, , and married February 17, Her death occurred July 15, , and her husband passed away August 17, He was a member of the Kings County militia. Jan Stryker had nine children by his first wife and five by the second. Pieter Stryker, the eldest child of his first wife, was born September 14, , at Flatbush, Long island, and about married Antje Deremer.

Death summoned him on December 28, He had eleven children by his first wife and one by the second. His son, John Stryker, the eighth child of his first union, was born March 2, , and became captain of the Somerset County militia but was afterwards attached to the state troops. His marriage with Lydia Cornell was solemnized November 13, , and on March 25, , he responded to the final summons.

His wife was born March 15, , and died November 4, John and Lydia Cornell Stryker were the parents of ten children. James I. She was born November 5, , and died about in Cayuga county, New York, while his demise occurred December 14, Their family numbered eight children.

Stryker died December 2, , in Vancouver, Washington, and her husband's death occurred in that city on December 21, In their family were four daughters, of whom Alice is the eldest. By her marriage to Daniel L. Cates she became the mother of four children. The fourth child died in infancy. Cates takes a keen interest in fraternal affairs and is a charter member of The Dalles Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, in which he has filled all of the chairs. In all matters of citizenship he is loyal, progressive and public-spirited and his personal qualities are such as make for popularity.

Clarke Publishing Company - ] Chrisman, Levi No public official of Wasco county enjoys a higher reputation than Levi Chrisman, who has served continuously as sheriff for a period of twenty-two years, and represents the third generation of the family in Oregon.

In , when their son Campbell E. Margaret Chrisman there passed away in and her husband remained on the ranch until He then sold the place and came to The Dalles, where he lived retired until his death a few years later. Campbell E. Chrisman was educated in the public schools of Dayton and remained at home until , when he moved to The Dalles. For a time he leased the ranch near Dufur and about purchased the property.

He cultivated the farm until and then sold the tract. Returning to The Dalles, he became a dealer in grain and conducted a grocery and a feed store. Catering to both the wholesale and retail trades, he established a large patronage and continued the business until , when he retired.

He served on the school board and manifested a deep interest in matters touching the welfare and progress of his community. Her parents, John E. Her father was a Christian minister and one of the early circuit riders of Oregon, traveling on horseback to isolated districts in order to spread the Gospel.

He passed away early in the '70s and his widow survived him by ten years. The demise of Campbell E. Chrisman occurred May 15, , at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Taylor, a resident of The Dalles, and on February 20, , his widow was called to her final rest. To their union were born seven children. Lulu, the eldest, was born on the homestead near Dufur and is the widow of Henry Taylor. She has two children: Mrs.

Lulu P. Hugh Chrisman is sheriff of Sherman county and has been the incumbent of the office for eight years. Levi is the next of the family and his brother Frank lives in Oakland, California. Emma, the seventh in order of birth, died in infancy. For four years he was a railroad employe and in ventured in business for himself at The Dalles. In partnership with his brother Frank he opened a meat market, which he conducted successfully for sixteen years, also dealing in live stock.

He was elected sheriff of Wasco county on the republican ticket in and his long retention in this office is an eloquent testimonial to the quality of his service. In the discharge of his important duties he is conscientious, efficient and fearless and during his tenure of office the percentage of crime in the country has been appreciably lowered. His record is unsullied and in length of service has never been equaled by any other sheriff in the state.

Chrisman married Miss Edna C. Martin, who was born in Illinois, and died February 13, She had become the mother of five children. Edna, the first born, is the wife of Robert P. Johnson, of Portland, Oregon, and has two daughters, Margaret and Virginia. The other children of Mr.

Chrisman are: Mrs. Neva M. Rasmussen, of Seattle, Washington; Robert, who was admitted to the bar in and is practicing in Wallowa, Oregon; Cecil, who is a junior at the University of Oregon and is preparing to enter the legal profession; and Elsie, who was graduated from the high school at The Dalles and is taking a course in a Portland business college.

The children are natives of The Dalles and all have received the benefit of a good education. In the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias he has filled all of the chairs and is also affiliated with the Woodmen of the World and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

He has a wide acquaintance and draws his friends from all walks of life, possessing those qualities which inspire strong and enduring regard. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Clausen, F. Agricultural progress in the Columbia River Valley has received marked impetus from the enterprising spirit and systematic labors of F.

Clausen, a pioneer wheat grower of Wasco county and one of its large land owners. Having accumulated a sum more than sufficient for his needs, he is spending the evening of life in ease and comfort and resides in an attractive home at The Dalles.

He was born February 1, , in Kolding, Denmark, and his parents, Nicolai and Karen Clausen, were life-long residents of that country. His father's demise occurred in and the mother long survived him, passing away in They had eight children, four of whom attained years of maturity: F. Clausen received a common school education and laid aside his textbooks at the age of sixteen, as his assistance was needed on the home farm.

His country was engaged in war with Germany, which took the province of Schleswig-Holstein as indemnity from Denmark. The family lived near the boundary line dividing the two countries and two brothers of F. Clausen served in the Danish army. Being unwilling to swear allegiance to Germany, he left his native land and on April 7, , sailed from Hamburg on a vessel which bore him to New York city.

He then purchased a ticket for San Francisco, California, and for a period of four years was engaged in dairying near Sacramento. In partnership with his brother James, he operated a wheat ranch in the Sacramento valley for two years and then decided to migrate to Oregon. Selling his interest in the ranch to his brother, he came to The Dalles in the spring of and soon afterward filed on a homestead on the Deschutes river, twenty miles southeast of the town.

He proved up on the land and later secured a timber claim. As fast as his resources permitted Mr. Clausen increased his holdings and is now the owner of three thousand acres of land in Wasco county. A tract of one thousand acres is devoted to the growing of grain and the balance is used for pasture and stock farming.

Endowed with keen powers of discernment, Mr. Clausen was the first man to recognize the fact that grain could be produced in this locality and the old cattle and sheep raisers were averse to the idea, saying that the land could be utilized only for grazing purposes owing to the dryness of the soil.

In he planted his first crop of wheat, which was destroyed by grasshoppers, but the next season he had better luck and in forty-five years of farming has had only one failure. His equipment is up-to-date and the fields are divided by well kept fences.

A modern house has been erected on the ranch, which is further improved with substantial barns and other outbuildings. The place is well irrigated and water from the spring is pumped to the house and other buildings. Clausen follows diversified farming and has found that the best results are obtained by summer fallowing. The soil yields good crops and he keeps about fifty head of horses for the farm work. His cattle and hogs are of high grade and he owns about one hundred and twenty-five head of stock, which he allows to run in the wheat fields after the grain is harvested.

Every detail of the work has been carefully planned and the ranch has proven a profitable investment because it is operated on an economic basis. Clausen is a firm believer in scientific methods of a culture and has demonstrated their value as factors in productiveness. In he leased the ranch to his sons, James and Otto, who are successfully managing the place and also own valuable stock farms.

Since his retirement Mr. Clausen has lived at The Dalles in a desirable home, which he purchased in , and during the busy season supervises the work on his farm. He has proven his faith in the future of The Dalles by judicious investments in real estate and is a stockholder in the Wrentham and Columbia Warehouse Companies, while he also owns a half-interest in two substantial business blocks, which were recently erected in the city.

It was during their honeymoon that Mr. Clausen made the trip to Oregon, traveling to The Dalles in a wagon drawn by four horses. Theirs proved an ideal union, which was terminated by the death of Mrs. Clausen on October 17, In their family were eight children, all of whom were born on the old homestead in Wasco county and received liberal educational advantages. Arthur, the first born, died at the age of six years. James is married and has one child, Edna. Cora is deceased.

Edna completed a course in The Dalles high school and was graduated from a nurses' training school maintained by one of the largest hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio. She is anaesthesian at The Dalles Hospital and also acts as housekeeper for her father. Otto is married and has two children, Fred and Virginia. During the World war he enlisted in the United States Engineers Corps, becoming sergeant of his company, and later was promoted to the position of chief engineer.

He spent two years overseas and is now filling a responsible position in Chicago, Illinois. Emma supplemented her high school education by attendance at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, from which she was graduated. For two years she was a student at the University of Washington and is now dietician at Dornbacher Hospital in Portland.

Clara, the youngest child, died at the age of seven years. His fraternal relations also extend to the Woodmen of the World. For eight years he was one of the commissioners of Wasco county and during his tenure of office the county built and paid for the finest courthouse in the state, with the exception of the one in Portland.

A strong advocate of educational advancement, Mr. Clausen was a member of the school board of his district for twenty-four years and has always evinced a keen desire to cooperate in movements for the general good. A man of stable purpose and marked strength of character, he has sown wisely and well and his life has been a succession of harvests. For nearly a half century he has resided in Wasco county, where he has a wide acquaintance, and enjoys to the fullest extent the esteem and confidence of all with whom he has been associated.

Clarke Publishing Company - ] Collins, John Wesley John Wesley Collins is one of the most active young business men of The Dalles, where he is conducting a prosperous wall paper and paint business. He was born in Jefferson county, Tennessee, in , his parents being William H. John W. Collins' first work was in a general merchandise store in his home town, but he did not find the pursuit to his liking and remained in that employ for only thirteen months.

He acted in that capacity for six years. In he determined to start out in business on his own account and having saved considerable money from his earnings and made many friends in the trade, he looked around for a location and after visiting The Dalles at once decided to cast his lot in the "cherry town," and renting a store, established business here.

After paying his rent and equipping his place he had left as a working capital just one hundred dollars, yet by he was the owner of the only wall paper and decorating concern in the city and was occupying a handsome store on the main business street, with a stock of wall paper and paint fully paid for and worth seven thousand dollars. Moreover, he is giving employment to eight expert painters and paper hangers.

He takes contracts for all kinds of painting and decorating work and has broadened the scope of his business by establishing a picture frame department. He also sells paint and paper and many decorative articles and the business is a growing one. Collins was married to Miss Ruby S. Pickens, a native of North Carolina, whose parents are now farming in Oregon. They have two children, Louelder and William Wesley. Collins is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and is active in support of all progressive civic interests.

Fraternally he is an Odd Fellow and a Yeoman. He enjoys the high regard of his brethren in these orders and has won a well deserved reputation as a reliable and progressive business man and valuable citizen. Among the most interesting features of the Oregon Daily Journal are the articles of Fred Lockley, who wrote the following account of the life of John B. I asked of Mr. McLoughlin sent him up to Stuart lake in British Columbia, to bring down the furs from their post there.

He was given command of ten three-ton boats. He piloted the leading boat himself and the others followed the lead of his boat. These boats made the round trip each summer from Stuart lake to Fort Vancouver. Coming down the Columbia, they shot the rapids at the cascades, but on the return trip they had to make a portage there.

They carried their loads around the cascades at what is now Cascade locks and towed their boats or carried them around the swift water. At the big eddy, sometimes called The Dalles rapids, they made another portage, carrying their loads clear beyond Celilo falls.

They put their boats into the river above Celilo and paddled them to the mouth of the Okanogan, where they put their trade goods on pack horses and took them over the divide to the waters of the Frazier river, where they had boats in which they took the goods to Stuart lake.

Father stayed with this work for some years - in fact, until , when they transferred him to Fort Walla Walla, now called Wallula. Spaulding down the river to Fort Vancouver. This was immediately after the killing of Dr. Marcus Whitman, Mrs. Whitman and the other white people at Wai-lat-pu mission. The Indians fired at my father and the other two men from the bank but did not hit them. They brought the news of the massacre to the Willamette valley, and soon the whole valley was humming with excitement like a hive of angry bees.

My father and Champagne joined their own people from French prairie to go up to Wai-lat-pu to punish the Indians. They fought with the volunteers from French prairie until the Cayuse war was over. She was at Dr. McLoughlin's mill on the island at what they sometimes called Willamette falls when I was born on April 27, , and when I was a few weeks old she returned to our place here.

My mother's name was Sophia Berchier. She pronounced it "Bushey. She lived to be ninety-four years old. When she was coming here by the old Hudson's Bay trail my brother Ed, who retired from the Portland police force recently after forty years of service, was born. The Indians attacked the party when Ed was one day old, so mother had to grab him up, catch her horse and get away from there as fast as the animal could travel. In the fall of he purchased from the Hudson's Bay Company a boat which he operated on the river between The Dalles and Fort Vancouver.

He took emigrants from The Dalles to Oregon City while the men of the party drove their cattle overland to the Willamette valley. Father had the contract to transport the soldiers from Vancouver to The Dalles in , when the United States government built the fort here. After this for three years he stayed on his land at Crates Point and farmed the place. In the summer of he operated his boat between Celilo and Wallula. Father acted as pilot on the first boat than ran from Celilo to Wallula and thence to the mouth of the Snake river.

I believe Captain Gray was skipper of the boat. After serving as pilot on this river for a while father returned to his ranch, later going to the newly discovered gold mines in Idaho, near where Lewiston now is. Father and mother had fourteen children, seven of whom are now living. In 1 was riding for Ben Snipe, whose horses ranged all over the Yakima country and along the Columbia. He had about twenty thousand head of cattle.

In my horse fell with me and broke in a lot of my ribs, so I came to The Dalles and went to work fur John Michaelbach, who ran a butcher shop here in those days. In my brother Ed and I purchased the shop. Ed soon went on the Portland police force. I ran the butcher shop for some years and sold out when I was appointed a member of the police force here. He was day man and I had the night shift.

There were thirty-two saloons here then. Yes, I have had to take guns away from hundreds of men. You see, when they get drunk they hardly know what they are doing and they frequently get ugly and pull their guns. If I didn't take the gun away they might kill someone, or someone might shoot them in self-defense. I served on the force over twenty years. Yes, I have lots of friends.

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Traveler type. Time of year. Language English. All languages. English 4. German Dutch 8. See what travelers are saying:. Selected filters. Updating list Erwin v. Reviewed January 14, Good food, good service, nice ambiance. Date of visit: January Reviewed October 17, via mobile Superb food. Date of visit: October Reviewed July 1, Salty and overcook.

Date of visit: December Reviewed December 6, Fantastic Date of visit: September View more reviews. Best nearby We rank these hotels, restaurants, and attractions by balancing reviews from our members with how close they are to this location. Best nearby hotels See all. Best nearby restaurants See all. Best nearby attractions See all. He received a common school education, but that he made the best use of his time when a student is shown by the prominence he has even at his present early age attained at the bar.

Naturally ambitious and realizing the scope that the practice of law afforded an active, energetic young man to attain fame and fortune, he early decided to adopt it as a profession. He read Blackstone, etc. Condon, of The Dalles, and in January, , having passed a very successful examination before the Supreme Court, he was admitted to the bar.

He was elected a member of the House from Wasco county at the last general election, but resigned his office before the Legislature convened to accept the office of Circuit Judge of the Fifth Judicial District, tendered him by Governor Thayer upon the resignation, September 1, , of Hon. During the brief time he has been on the bench he has given universal satisfaction, showing an earnest and conscientious disposition to deal justly and at the same time hew closely to the strict line of the law.

His opinions are indicative of careful study and a thorough knowledge of the common law. He is a pleasant, companionable gentleman and makes friends rapidly. Politically speaking he is a Democrat, and matrimonially considered he is a young bachelor, although not beyond redemption. He is six feet one inch high, weighs about pounds, and is of robust, hearty health.

As a friend he is valued, as a man he is esteemed, as an attorney he is respected, and as a Judge he is honored and revered. Galvin; Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House; Transcribed by GT Team] Blakeley, George Clarence George Clarence Blakeley, a pharmacist of state-wide repute, enjoys the distinction of being the oldest established druggist in The Dalles, which for more than forty years has numbered him among its useful and influential citizens. His talents have been exerted as readily for the public welfare as for his own aggrandizement and his record reflects credit upon an honored family name.

A native of Oregon, he was born in Brownsville, Linn County, August 29, , and represents one of the oldest and most prominent families of the state. His great-grandfather, Charles Blakeley, was a native of Ireland and when a small boy came to the new world with his parents, who were among the colonial settlers of Virginia.

As a soldier in the Revolutionary war Charles Blakeley aided in winning American independence and afterward went to Tennessee. The remainder of his life was spent in that state and when eighty years of age he was called to his final rest. He was the father of Joseph Blakeley, who was also a patriotic citizen and fought in the War of In he migrated to Platte county, Missouri, where he engaged in farming and stock raising until his demise, and for twenty-six years served as a circuit judge.

His son, James Blakeley, father of George Clarence Blakeley, was born November 26, , in Knox county, Tennessee and received his education in the district schools of that state. He remained at home until he was twenty-two years of age and in married Miss Sarah Dick, who was born November 24, , in Knox county, Tennessee. Blakeley followed agricultural pursuits in his native state until , when he went to Missouri and filed on a homestead.

He cleared and developed the tract, on which he resided until , when he disposed of the property and started for Oregon, joining a large wagon train, of which he was chosen captain. In the fall of he arrived in Linn county and entered a donation claim of six hundred and forty acres, settling where the town of Brownsville is now located. Here he built a small log house and zealously applied himself to the arduous task of clearing the land and preparing it for the growing of crops.

In order to obtain a plow he had to go to Oregon City, a distance of seventy-five miles, and made the trip with a team of oxen. There were no bridges or roads and two weeks were required to complete the journey. In he produced his first crop of grain and this was probably the first yield in Linn county. A successful stockman, he raised many head of cattle, horses and hogs and took large herds of cattle to the ranges in eastern Oregon.

He fattened cattle for the market and drove them to California, disposing of them to the miners. Blakeley built the first flour mill in Oregon and in erected the first store in Brownsville. His trade was largely with the Indians, as there were few white settlers in the locality at that time. For several years he successfully conducted the store and then sold the business to George C.

Cooley, his son-in-law. After retiring from the field of merchandising Captain Blakeley resumed the occupations of farming and stock raising; which he followed during the remainder of his active career. He represented Linn county in the state legislature and filled other public offices of importance, faithfully discharging every trust reposed in him. Captain Blakeley long survived his wife, who died June 14, On November 26, , he celebrated the one hundredth anniversary of his birth and in commemoration of the event a medal was made, which is now in the custody of the State Historical Society.

During the latter part of his life Captain Blakeley resided in the home of his son Henry in Brownsville and there passed away January 19, He was a man of exceptional worth and his death was mourned throughout the state. To Captain Blakeley and his wife were born eleven children: Mrs.

Ellen Montgomery and Mrs. George C. Cooley, who has passed away; Mrs. Sarah McFarlane, of Brownsville. In a splendid granite shaft fourteen feet tall was erected by Captain Blakeley's surviving children to the memory of their father at Main and Blakeley avenues, the original site of his claim. When the shaft was dedicated "Peggy" Chessman, the thirteen-year-old daughter of Mr. Merle Chess-man of Astoria, delivered the following address of presentation: "Mr.

Mayor and friends: I have come here as the great-great-granddaughter of Captain and Mrs. James Blakeley, in whose memory this monument has been erected. It was placed here by their children to stand as a lasting tribute of love and honor to their parents, who settled on this spot when Oregon was almost a virgin wilderness and who made it their home for more than half a century.

In a broader sense, it is dedicated to all those early-day pioneers, of whom Captain and Mrs. Blakeley were typical; those pathfinders who blazed the trail to Oregon, enduring the hazards and hardships of frontier life while they builded the foundations of the state, and the fruits of whose labors we of later generations enjoy. Mayor, as a representative of the city of Brownsville, a deed to the monument and the plot of ground upon which it stands, that the people of this historic town may have and hold it as theirs forever.

It represents an expression of one of the fundamental principles of American citizenship. The great nations of the past have risen in prominence and influence, flourished for a period and passed into a decline. The beginning of this decline may invariably be traced to the loss of the patriotic spirit that predominated during the period of the nation's ascendancy. Just as long as expressions of this nature are in evidence we may rest assured that the spark of patriotism that in times of national peril has been the impelling force to call to the defense of the native land the flower of our sturdy manhood, needs but the call of necessity to fan to the flame that has assembled the mighty armies that have decisively repelled the invader, overwhelmingly put down internal opposition and emerged in triumph from an effort to end a struggle in which civilization itself was threatened.

During the course of years it had grown and developed, attaining the fullness of its sturdiness and splendor. In the strength of its fiber it withstood the storms of the succeeding seasons. In its allotted time strength declined; this, the peer of the forest, bowed before the grim reaper, and the spot upon which it had stood gave no evidence of a former greatness. During the period of its strength and vigor, in accordance with nature's plan, acorns had fallen from its branches, and in passing, the sturdy oak left behind a young and vigorous forest that gave mute testimony that a predecessor had fulfilled its destiny.

The power of this republic does not lie in the accomplishment of a few supermen, but rather in the steadfastness, loyalty and patriotism of the men and women who take up the every-day tasks of existence. Blakeley obtained his rudimentary instruction and was next a pupil in the public schools of Brownsville.

He attended Albany College for a year and for three years was a student at the Oregon Agricultural College in Corvallis. Entering the educational field, he became a teacher in the public schools of Brownsville and was made principal, filling the position for three years. For six years he represented the firm in that capacity and then went to Canada, spending a year in Victoria, British Columbia.

In he returned to Oregon, locating at The Dalles, and in May of that year entered the employ of R. Hood, a local druggist. In January, , Mr. Blakeley purchased the business, of which he has since been the owner. He carries a full line of drugs and medical supplies and the filling of prescriptions is one of the chief features of his establishment, which is not a cafeteria and soda fountain pharmacy.

It is known as the Rexall Drug Store, whose trade exceeds the boundaries of the city, extending into the surrounding country. Enterprising, efficient and thoroughly reliable, Mr. Blakeley has won and retained a position of leadership in local drug circles and is also an astute financier. In he aided in organizing the Wasco County Bank and was elected president of the institution, which is capitalized at one hundred thousand dollars and occupies an imposing building on East Second street.

Blakeley is likewise a successful fruit grower and has a valuable cherry orchard of thirty acres. The ranch is located near The Dalles and irrigated with water from the city. Blakeley was married January 29, , to Miss Mary T. The family went to San Francisco, California, by the water route, making the voyage around Cape Horn, and in came to Oregon.

For an extended period Mr. Gorman was engaged in the transfer business in Portland and his demise occurred in the Rose City in , when he had reached the advanced age of ninety-seven years. Of the children born to Mr. Gorman, two are now living: Mrs. Blakeley, and Mrs. Margaret Ordahl, a resident of Portland. As one of the councilmen of The Dalles, Mr. Blakeley was instrumental in securing for the municipality needed reforms and improvements and is always ready to serve his community to the extent of his ability.

When he became county judge of Wasco and Hood River counties the public funds were depleted and there was an indebtedness of two hundred thousand dollars. For eight years he was the incumbent of the office and during that period removed this burden of debt from the counties without increasing the taxation.

During the World war he was chairman for four years of the committee in charge of the Red Cross activities in Wasco, Sherman, Wheeler and Gilliam counties and succeeded in raising a large amount of money for the organization. Blakeley joined the Masonic order, with which his father was also affiliated, and has attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite Consistory. He is a past master of the blue lodge, past high priest of the chapter and past eminent commander of the commandery.

For a year Mr. Blakeley was the executive head of the Rexall Club, an international association, which draws its members from the United States, Canada and Great Britain. He was the first president of the club elected west of the Rockies and on his retirement from the office in was presented with a handsome watch, suitably inscribed, as a testimonial of appreciation of his services.

Blakeley was the second president of the Oregon Pharmaceutical Association and served for fifteen years on the state board of pharmacy. In addition to his attractive residence in The Dalles, he has a fine home at Seaside, where he spends a portion of each summer, and is one of the disciples of Izaak Walton.

He is also a devotee of golf and an expert player. Worthy motives and high principles have actuated Mr. Blakeley at all points in his career and throughout eastern Oregon he is admired and respected. Blakeney, who was among the first settlers of Wasco county, performed his full part in the drama of early civilization here, and to a marked degree commanded the confidence and respect of his fellowmen.

He was there reared and educated and in the early '40s went to Illinois, where he engaged in farming. In he sold out there and, with a good outfit, including ox teams and covered wagons, started on the long journey across the plains to Oregon. The party was well provisioned at the start, but, owing to their generosity in sharing their food with other less fortunate than themselves, ran short and Mr.

Blakeney paid as much as a dollar each for biscuits for himself and family. They arrived in Oregon in the late fall of , and proceeded on to Cowlitz county, Washington, where he took up a homestead. They lived there until , when he sold out and came to The Dalles, Oregon, bringing the furniture and household goods, as well as twenty-five head of cattle, on a scow from the Cowlitz river to the lower Cascades.

They transported their stuff above the Cascades and there took a steamer to The Dalles. For several years Mr. Blakeney ran a pack train from The Dalles to the mines in eastern Oregon, in which he met with success, and later established a livery stable and draying business in The Dalles, which he conducted to the time of his death, February 20, His wife died in In December, , in Illinois, Mr. Blakeney was married to Miss Nancy Phelps, who was born in Danville, Vermillion county, Illinois, September 8, , and they became the parents of six children, namely: Hugh T.

Blakeney was a man of sterling character, energetic methods and sound judgment and during his active career took a deep interest in the progress and development of his city and community. Emma J. Blakeney was educated in the public schools at The Dalles and remained at home until her marriage, June 21, , to William T. McClure, who was born in Missouri, April 18, He came to Wasco county with his family in an early day and as soon as old enough took up a preemption claim of one hundred and sixty acres, about four and a half miles east of Mosier.

His father and brother also took claims in the same district and were the second family to settle in that locality. McClure's land was partly covered with oak grubs, which he cleared off and, after building a good house, he engaged in farming, raising grain, hay, cattle and horses. He was successful in his operations and later bought sixty additional acres, a part of the Nathan Morris donation claim.

This was good bottom land and on it he raised bountiful crops of alfalfa and potatoes, as well as asparagus. He was energetic and progressive in his methods and devoted himself closely to the operation of the farm to the time of his death, on March 13, To Mr. McClure were born six children: Mrs. Josephine Evans, who lives in Portland, Oregon, and is the mother of four children, Mrs. Mabel Miller, Mrs. Blanche Durham, Robert M. Jessie A. Pearl Ellis, of Portland. McClure was a Mason and was a man of fine public spirit, taking an active interest in everything affecting the welfare of his community.

He was particularly interested in educational matters and served for many years either as clerk or a member of the school board. William T. McClure, Jr. He raises good crops of hay and grain and potatoes, has three acres in asparagus, and also has a nice herd of dairy cows, a number of hogs and a large number of chickens. The McClure homestead, which is located midway between Hood River and The Dalles, on the famous Columbia River highway, is finely situated, commanding a magnificent view of the majestic river, and is regarded as one of the best farms in this section of the valley.

McClure and his mother are kindly and hospitable, give their earnest support to all local interests of value to the locality, and throughout the community are held in the highest esteem. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Bolton, Grifford Virgil An interesting story of earnest endeavor, intelligently directed, constitutes the life record of Grifford Virgil Bolton, who was for many years actively and prominently associated with banking interests of The Dalles.

Moreover, he was a native son of Oregon and throughout his life was a supporter of all the well devised plans and measures for the upbuilding of his city and state. Both were natives of Virginia and representatives of old families of that state. At an early day they journeyed westward to become residents of Oregon and took up their abode on a farm in the vicinity of The Dalles on Fifteen Mile creek, where occurred the birth of their son Virgil.

He first served in a clerical capacity but bent every energy toward acquainting himself with the banking business in principle and detail and his thoroughness, his industry and loyalty won him promotions from time to time until he soon became cashier and one of the chief executive officers of the institution. He continued to hold that position until his death, which occurred on the 7th of March, , when he was but thirty-two years of age.

Although he passed away at a comparatively early age he had accomplished much more than many a man of twice his years. He had made for himself a most creditable position in financial circles, enjoying an unassailable reputation for business integrity as well as enterprise. On the 28th of March, , Mr.

Bolton was united in marriage to Miss Nellie J. French and they became the parents of two daughters: Carmel French, who is now the wife of Frank A. Ryder of Portland: and Nonearle French, who is at home with her mother. Bolton was always keenly interested in public affairs at The Dalles and recognition of his public spirit and his devotion to the general good was manifest in his election to the mayoralty.

He belonged to the Masonic fraternity of which he was an exemplary representative and his entire life was characterized by those qualities which in every land and clime awaken confidence and respect. His widow is now living at Alexandra Court, in Portland and is well known in the best circles of the Rose City.

Married June 25, , to Agnes L. Educated at the common schools of Lafayette, Ore. Louis, Mo. Admitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon in Practiced law in Yamhill County until , when he removed to The Dalles and practiced his profession until May , when he was appointed Judge of Seventh Judicial District of Oregon, and has served ever since. Member K. Thirty-six years of his life have been spent in Wasco county, which numbers him among its foremost agriculturists, and his activities have also been of benefit to The Dalles.

There were seven children in the family, and Thomas Brogan is the only one now living. He was reared on his father's farm and received a limited education. Leaving home when a boy of twelve, he came to the United States alone in and obtained work in the coal mines of Pennsylvania. In he went to Liverpool, England, and for six months was on a sailing vessel bound for Australia.

He landed in Melbourne, but soon after made the voyage to New Zealand, and was there engaged in mining for five years, developing a claim which yielded considerable gold. Brogan then returned to Australia and devoted his attention to the sheep and cattle business. He also took contracts for the construction of buildings and roads and prospered in all of his ventures. In he disposed of his business in Australia and returned to the United States, identifying his interests with those of the Pacific northwest.

He purchased a large ranch in Wasco county and devoted his energies to the cultivation of the soil and the raising of livestock. Success attended his well directed labors and from time to time he increased his holdings, which now comprise sixteen thousand acres of land in Wasco county. He is the largest individual landowner in the county, and runs about four thousand head of sheep and a large band of cattle, but the management of the place is now intrusted to his son, John Brogan.

The father's various ranches are improved with good buildings and contain sixty-seven miles of fencing. The work is facilitated by modern equipment and the most advanced methods are utilized in cultivating the land and caring for the stock. Brogan puts up six hundred tons of hay and alfalfa each year, and all of the grain and hay grown on the land is fed to the stock. In he moved to The Dalles, purchasing a desirable home on Webster street, and also owns several lots in the city.

He is the largest stockholder of the Citizens National Bank of The Dalles, of which he was one of the organizers, but has steadfastly refused to become an officer of the institution, feeling that the preference should be given to a younger man. Collopy, who was born in that country. Her parents, William and Elizabeth O'Brien Collopy, were natives of Ireland and became pioneer settlers of New Zealand, in which they spent the remainder of their lives.

The father followed agricultural pursuits and was a prosperous stock raiser. Collopy were born twelve children and three are now living: Bridget M. Brogan became the parents of twelve children, six of whom survive. Mary was born in New Zealand and has remained at home. Bridget, also a native of New Zealand, became the wife of J. Robinson and has a daughter, Lillian, who is now Mrs. Ned Wyke of Portland, Oregon. John was born in New Zealand, and resides in Antelope, Oregon.

Susan is likewise a native of New Zealand, and has become the wife of Frank Weiss. Katherine was born in Wasco county, and is part owner of a greenhouse at The Dalles. Frances Grace, also a native of Wasco county, is now Mrs. John Becker. She resides in Woodburn and is the mother of one child, Thomas Joseph Becker. For more than a half century Mr. Brogan have journeyed together through life and in they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. On that happy occasion a banquet was held at Hotel Dalles and there Mr.

Brogan entertained about forty friends, from whom they received many beautiful gifts as well as congratulations. Among the treasured possessions of Mr. Brogan is a rare onyx clock, tendered him by the premier of New Zealand and several of his most intimate friends at the time of his departure for the United States. Brogan exercises his right of franchise in support of the candidates and tenets of the republican party, and his public spirit has been demonstrated by effective work in behalf of good roads and schools.

His has been a picturesque career, replete with interesting experiences. He enjoys life and is esteemed for the qualities to which he owes his success. In May, , Mr. Brogan with Katherine and Frances, took a trip to Ireland, revisiting the old home. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Browne, Dr. He is now a successful chiropractor of The Dalles, where he is accorded a liberal patronage. His parents were Christopher C.

The Brownes were of old Pennsylvania stock and the great-grandfather of the Doctor became a pioneer of Missouri. The Mason family came from New England ancestry and were pioneers of Indiana. Christopher C. Browne removed with his family to Oregon when his son Daniel was but a small boy and settled in Salem. The latter acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of Salem and afterward pursued an academic course at Dallas, while his professional training was received in the Pacific Chiropractic College at Portland.

Following his graduation he took up active professional work in that city and there remained from until During his stay in Portland he was for three years secretary of the Oregon Chiropractic Association and published a magazine called The Drugless Review, devoted to the school of healing which he represents. He was one of a committee appointed to draft a bill legalizing the practice of chiropractic, which was passed by the legislature in His work in that connection required so much of his time that he was forced to permit The Drugless Review to die just as it was getting on a paying basis.

This unselfishness on his part is but an index of the character of the man. In Dr. Ingram, who had built up an extensive business in The Dalles, invited Dr. Browne was united in marriage to Miss Almona R. Daniels, a daughter of Francis M.

Daniels, who was a merchant. They have one child, Elizabeth, a student in the Junior high school in The Dalles. Fraternally Dr. Browne is connected with the Elks and with the Knights of Pythias. He holds to the higest standards in his profession and his ability and enterprise have brought him prominently to the front.

Robert R. Butler, a member of one of the leading law firms of The Dalles, has become well known through his service as circuit judge, as state senator, and as one of the political leaders of Oregon. He was born September 24, , in Johnson county, Tennessee, and is a son of Dr.

William H. One of Mr. Butler's ancestors figured prominently in events which shaped the early history of Johnson county and the town of Butler was named in his honor. Colonel Roderick Randon Butler, the father of Dr. William R. Grayson, the maternal grandfather of Robert H. Butler, was also a gallant officer in the Union army and rose to the rank of colonel. Butler received the M. He is a physician of high standing and draws his patients from a wide area.

To Dr. Butler were born ten children: Mrs. Baker, who lives in the state of Washington; Robert R. Sproles, who resides in North Carolina; C. James Rivers, of North Carolina. Butler was reared in the town of Butler, which has been the home of the family for generations, and supplemented his public school training by attendance at the Holly Spring College.

He received the degree of LL. For three years he followed his profession at Mountain City, Tennessee, and in came to Oregon, locating in Condon, Gilliam county, where he practiced for five years. His legal acumen led to his election to the bench and during and he was circuit judge of Sherman, Wheeler and Gilliam counties.

To each case brought before his tribunal he gave deep thought and study and the justice of his rulings proved his moral worth. As mayor of Condon he also made an excellent record and since has been a resident of The Dalles. He has a comprehensive knowledge of law and displays marked skill in its exposition.

In he formed a partnership with Samuel E. Van Vactor, who is the senior member of the firm, and a large and important clientele denotes the confidence reposed in their ability as advocates and counselors. Butler was married in and has a daughter, Elizabeth Annabel.

She was born at The Dalles, June 30, , and is attending St. Helen's Hall in Portland, Oregon. A power in the ranks of the republican party, Mr. Butler was chosen presidential elector-at-large and in was made messenger to Washington, D. In he was elected state senator without opposition and from until was a member of that law-making body.

In he again became presidential elector for Oregon and in was recalled to the office of state senator. He served from until and exerted his influence in behalf of all constructive legislation. Butler is a Kiwanian and a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. His well developed powers have brought him to the front in his profession and the firmness, frankness and strength of his character have established him high in public regard.

His paternal grandfather was a native of Virginia and the family were among the early pioneers of Illinois. The Coy family was of Quaker stock and numbered among the earliest residents of Pennsylvania. In Polk Butler removed with his family to Oregon, settling at Dufur, Wasco county, at which time Roy was a lad of but four years.

He acquired his education in the graded schools of Dufur and in the high school at The Dalles. When quite young he entered into the mercantile business as a clerk in a general store at Boyd, Wasco county, and afterward turned his attention to ranching on Eight Mile creek, where he secured four hundred and forty acres, on which he planted an orchard and also engaged in raising cattle for the next ten years. He likewise became interested in the mercantile business at Boyd during the same period.

Butler was elected to the office of county commissioner and occupied that position for four years. In the meantime he took up his residence at The Dalles and upon the expiration of his term as commissioner he established the insurance agency which he still conducts. He is the representative of the Oregon Fire Relief Association for the district which embraces the counties of Morrow, Gilliam, Wasco, Hood River and Sherman and has placed his company upon a sound basis in this territory, having developed a business of gratifying and substantial proportions.

Butler was married to Miss Ethel Southern, a daughter of C. Southern, a pioneer farmer of Wasco county. They have two children: Melva May and Roy Dale, both high school pupils. Butler has a sister, Mrs. Edward Griffin, of Wasco county, and two brothers: the Rev. Butler, a missionary in South Africa and E. Butler, living at The Dalles. Butler gives his political allegiance to the democratic party, yet he cannot be said to be a politician in the sense of office seeking.

The only public office he has filled besides that of county commissioner was that of postmaster at Boyd. He is an active member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has filled all of the chairs in the local organization. The Butler family has long been represented in Oregon, for Roy D. Butler is a nephew of Daniel Butler, who came to this state in the '40s and is frequently mentioned in history as one of the founders of the state and as a fearless Indian fighter. Under other conditions Roy D.

Butler is just as loyal to the best interests of Oregon and is justly accounted one of the representative citizens of The Dalles. Collector of Internal Revenue for the District and State of Oregon, is one of those quiet, unassuming gentlemen, whom we sometimes meet in the walks of public life, and realize the fact that in his case at least the office has sought the man, not the man the office, as is too generally the case.

He is a native of Michigan and was born in He came to Oregon in and read law with Hon. Wilson, afterwards Representative in Congress from this State. He was admitted to the bar in and opened an office at Salem. He was a member of the House from Marion County in , and in was elected State Senator from the same county.

In he received the appointment of United States District Attorney. At the expiration of his term of service in this capacity in , owing to failing health, he removed to Eastern Washington Territory, and there engaged in the stock business until , when he moved to The Dalles, and, in partnership with Hon. Dunbar, resumed the practice of law. In he was elected Presidential Elector on the Republican ticket and was a participant in the memorable Electoral College of that year, when poor Cronin - peace to his ashes - was so prominent a factor, and when Oregon's vote elected President Hayes.

In May, , he received his present appointment. Cartwright is a gentleman who is highly esteemed by all who know him and is regarded as a man of sterling integrity. He is tall and spare built, smooth face, save the mustache, sharp features, clear peaceful eye, and black hair.

He is a warm personal friend and one that never forgets a favor. He is courteous, genial and generous. As a public officer, he is attentive and obliging and in every way efficient. Helm, of the M. Team] Cates, Daniel L. Conscientious and efficient, Daniel L.

Cates has thoroughly demonstrated his worth as a public servant and for eleven years has been city recorder of The Dalles. He is a loyal Oregonian and a member of one of the honored, pioneer families of the state. The following account of his career was written by Fred Lockley and published in the Oregon Journal under date of November 29, 'I was born in a log cabin on the Long Tom, near Starr's Point, in Benton county, May 7, ,' said Mr.

His father's name was Alexander Cates. His mother's maiden name was Nancy Phipps and she was also a Kentuckian. My father left the Blue Grass state in , when he was nineteen years of age, and went to Missouri with an uncle, John Newton. She was a daughter of Daniel Grice, who went from that state to Kentucky and later located in Linn county, Missouri. Father and his brother-in-law, Daniel Grice, built houses. In those days all lumber, including the flooring, was dressed by hand. Father had taken up a place in Linn county and in addition to working at his trade, raised corn and tobacco.

Flournoy and his relatives. They took the usual emigrant route during the first part of the trip and went by way of the cut-off to Fort Hall. The Nemaha river was crossed on rafts built by members of the party and at Salt creek they were detained for two days. There were few accidents on the trip, though in the early part of it an exciting incident occurred in the Pawnee country.

One morning a man came riding toward them at top speed on a fine grey horse and warned them of Indians who had attacked a train in advance of them. Three parties of emigrants had left Missouri at about the same time, the Flournoy train, the one attacked by Indians and what was called the Ohio train. The last consisted of forty men without a woman or child among them. There were two Indians in sight in an elevated position, signaling to the band that led in the attack and informing them of the movements of the whites.

The Ohio train rushed in from the rear on horseback and soon reached the Indians. The wagons of the Flournoy train were placed in a double row and the party advanced as rapidly as possible. After robbing the women of their jewelry and taking as much food and clothing as they could lay hands on, the Indians escaped and no one was injured.

The Flournoy train followed the route to the crossing of the Portneuf, which runs into the Snake river, and then traveled to the south, crossing the Raft river. As they followed its course they came to that remarkable creation of nature, the Thousand Spring valley, containing those famous soda springs which vary in temperature from boiling hot to ice cold and which cover an area of several square miles. Proceeding through what was afterwards called the Landers cut-off, they came out on the Green river and followed its course to St.

Mary's river. After passing the three Humboldt lakes they 1 were warned by a note tacked up by the roadside of danger from Indians. Two men had been killed and a little farther on the body of an Indian was found lying in the road. At the foot of the last lake two roads separate, one leading to the Carson river and the other to the Truckee river.

The party followed the Truckee road and about September 17, , camped where the Donner party endured their sufferings and where some met their tragic deaths in They could see plainly where the trees had been cut down and limbs cut off of others ten or twelve feet above the ground, showing how deep the snow must have been when they camped on it. Later he took up a claim on Poor Man creek, finding dirt which paid him thirty dollars a day with pick and pan.

After working the claim for a month the heavy snow drove him out and he went back to Nevada City, where he spent the winter. Next spring he found a claim from which. In company with three other miners he engaged in prospecting on Kanaha creek. They struck a claim where they took out fifty dollars a day. As soon as their grub was gone they went back to Nevada City and brought out twelve hundred pounds of supplies on seven pack horses.

They found their claim had been jumped, so they struck out down the creek and struck another claim even richer than the first. On July 4, , the four of them took out over six hundred dollars. They averaged about one hundred dollars a day. My father's partners became dissatisfied and thought they could find a richer ground, so he bought them out and worked the claim until late in the fall of Downieville, the nearest post office, was twelve miles distant by mountain trail.

He worked on a hotel and was paid ten dollars a day. After the hotel was built he went to Sacramento and from there to San Francisco, where he bought a ticket for Panama. He had to pay sixteen dollars for the use of a mule to ride twenty-six miles across the isthmus to connect with a boat. After he had ridden about two-thirds of the way he overtook a miner, who offered him eight dollars for the use of the mule for the remaining eight miles, so father walked the rest of the way.

He had to pay a fare of ten dollars on a rowboat which took him to the Atlantic side of the isthmus. The natives were having a revolution and told the Californians to keep off the streets so they wouldn't get hurt. However, the Americans wanted to see what was going on, so one of them was killed, as well as a number of natives. The American consul sent out to the Cherokee and Ohio, which were anchored in the stream, and got a brass six-pounder and an iron cannon.

He put these so he could sweep the street and told the natives that if they fought any more or killed any more Americans he would turn the cannon loose, so they decided to quit fighting. He bought a steerage ticket for New York for fifty dollars. The first cabin ticket was seventy-five dollars.

After he got on the boat he paid the purser five dollars extra to sit at the first cabin table and have a cabin like the first class passengers. The Ohio was a sidewheeler and there were about two hundred returning gold miners aboard. At Havana they transferred to the Georgia for New Orleans. In the Crescent city he paid sixteen dollars for a ticket to St. Louis and made the trip of about twelve-hundred miles on the Patrick Henry. At St. Louis he took passage on a small boat called the Lewis F.

Linn, for Brunswick, the great tobacco trading point on the Missouri, traveling with Washington Leach, who had been his companion in the mines of California and on the returning sea voyage. At Brunswick he hired a rig to drive to Linneus, where he had left mother. When he arrived there he found that his father-in-law had sold out and that mother had gone to Jive with Uncle Newton.

He hired a man to drive him out to the Newton place. He bought a house and lot for three hundred dollars and got a job as carpenter at a dollar and a quarter a day. In the party were father's cousin, Ambrose Newton, who brought his wife and three children. He had two wagons, with four yoke of oxen to each, and was accompanied by three young men, who came along to work for their board. Father had one wagon, three yoke of oxen and two cows.

In his wagon were himself, mother, Sarah, the baby, and a young man named Washington Ward, who went along to work for his hoard. The members of the train chose father as their captain because of his previous experience in crossing the plains. The emigrants drove to St. Joseph, Missouri, and thence up the river, which they crossed at Council Bluffs. They took the south side of the Platte. A large party of Pawnee Indians accompanied them almost to Ash Hollow. There my father and Mr.

Wiley went on a hunting expedition. Father killed a big buffalo and they loaded their horses with meat. When they were hunting a hail storm came up which was so severe that the cattle couldn't face it. They turned around and drifted with the storm. On the Bear river in Utah six saddle horses were stolen. Father lost a good horse. He said that when he and Fowler were looking for the horses they met an Indian on a cayuse,while his squaw was mounted on a big roan horse.

Father had a rifle with inlaid silver work and the Indian tried to take it. Father pulled out his Colt revolver and the Indian changed his mind, and the last father saw of him and the squaw they were making their horses go as fast as they could. The next day the party arrived at Steamboat Springs, where an Englishman had a trading station.

After crossing the Malheur river they went down the Snake and struck Burnt river at a point where Huntington was afterward built. They passed through the Powder River valley below the place where Baker City is now located and there father suffered from blood poisoning, which endangered his life. After coming into the Grande Ronde valley they passed Medical lake and in the Blue mountains stayed over night at Lee's encampment, now Bingham Springs.

Then they proceeded down the Wild Horse through what is now the Umatilla Indian reservation, finding Indians there who were raising corn and potatoes. After reaching Deschutes they made their way down Ten-Mile creek and thence to Tygh valley.

They passed through the Barlow tollgate and down Laurel Hill, soon afterward coming to the Big Sandy valley. On September 9 they reached Foster's famous ranch and on the 11th crossed the Willamette at Portland on a capstan and two horses.

In father and Fred Flora took a contract to get out timbers and build a barn for Captain Doty in Yamhill county. Father next built a granary for Mr. McLeod on Tualatin plains. They paid him seven dollars a day and he took his pay in flour, which he sold in Portland.

From Tualatin plains he moved to the Long Tom, in Beaten county, where he bought, for three hundred dollars, a quarter section. Forty acres of the tract had been fenced and there was a good house on the place. Father bought a land entry of one hundred and sixty acres for one hundred and twenty dollars and took up the adjoining quarter section. The first loom on the Long Tom was constructed by father, who built it for Mrs.

He was paid forty dollars for the job. Ferguson wove homespun cloth. He bought a new wagon, a span of mules and ninety head of cattle. He hired John Florence to drive the stock over the Barlow trail to the Dennis Maloney place, near the present site of Dufur.

Father traded our place to Mrs. Upton for two large mares, Pet and Pigeon. Afterward father moved to Eight-Mile creek, purchasing a farm from "Big Steve" Edwards, and there mother died in the fall of , leaving two sons and two daughters, one a baby less than a year old. The hard winter of nearly wiped father off the map financially. He had only thirty head of stock left when the snow went off in the spring.

Susan Griffin, my mother's sister, died shortly alter we children went there. Father and Fred Flora had started in the spring of with a herd of cattle for the Orofino mines in Idaho. My sister did the housework. When J. Broadwell bought the place my sister Sarah and I stayed with him for two years. My brother Willie went to Idaho with my father, who purchased a mine in the Boise basin and later moved to Rocky Bar, in Alturas county, that state. He was absent two years and brought home fourteen hundred dollars.

He built a mill on Fifteen-Mile creek near the Meadows, also owning a mill on the Columbia, opposite Wind river, and this he later sold to Joseph T. While operating the plant he built a small steamboat to handle the lumber. After disposing of his mills father worked for a time at his trade and aided in constructing the shoe factory in North Dalles.

In father married Mrs. Elizabeth Herbert, a widow, who had two children: Mrs. Jane Sherer, deceased; and George A. Herbert, now a resident of Baker, Oregon. The mother of these children passed away at The Dalles and father's death occurred at Cascade Locks, Oregon, in My sister Sarah, the oldest of the family, was born in Missouri in On May 10, , she became the wife of William Frizzell, and her demise occurred in at Cascade Locks.

My brother William was born in Benton county, Oregon, in and is now living in Oakland, California. I was the third child and my full name is Daniel Lycurgus Cates. My sister Susan was born February 14, , in Wasco county, Oregon. She became the wife of W. Wilson, a well known attorney of Portland, Oregon, and died February 14, Cates attended the public schools at The Dalles and one of his instructors was Professor S.

From until he was in the employ of his father, who at that time was operating a saw mill above Cascade Locks, where the town of Wyeth is now located. His lumber yard at The Dalles was managed by Daniel L. Cates, who afterward became a bookkeeper for John H. Larsen, a dealer in wool and hides. Cates remained until , when he was appointed a deputy under George Herbert, sheriff of Wasco county, and acted in that capacity for four years.

In he was elected sheriff and served for two years, thoroughly justifying the trust reposed in him. In August, , he located at Cascade Locks, opening a general store, which he conducted during the construction of the locks. About five hundred men were at work and in the locks were completed by J.

At that time Mr. Cates disposed of the business and established a drug store, of which he was the proprietor for two years. Crossing the Columbia river, he purchased a tract of three hundred and twenty acres in Skamania county, Washington, and applied himself to the task of clearing the land. He cut down the timber, which he sawed into logs, and disposed of them at a good figure.

A few years later he sold the ranch and in November, , returned to The Dalles. Prosperity had attended his various undertakings and for a time he lived retired. In he was prevailed upon to reenter the arena of public affairs and has since been city recorder. His duties are discharged with characteristic thoroughness and fidelity and his continued retention in the office proves that his services are appreciated.

On October 9, , Mr. Cates is the ninth in line of descent from Jan Stryker, who was born in Holland in and emigrated from Ruinen, a village in the province of Drenthe, with his wife, two sons and four daughters, arriving at New Amsterdam in The mother of these children was Lambertje Seubering, who died several years after the family came to America.

She survived her husband, who was a man of prominence in colonial days. In he was elected chief magistrate of Midworet and according to the Colonial History of New York" he was a member of the embassy sent from New Amsterdam to the lord mayors in Holland.

The history also states that he became a representative in the general assembly on April 10, , a member of the Hempstead convention of , and was commissioned captain of a military company on October 25, His brother, who also came to this country, was named Jacobus Garretsen Stryker. Jan Stryker and his first wife had a large family. She died June 17, , and his demise occurred June 11, He was high sheriff of Kings county, Long Island; judge of the court from until , and was made captain of a foot company in On June 1, , he purchased four thousand acres of land on Millstone river in Somerset county, New Jersey.

It does not appear that he ever lived on this property but his sons, Jacob and Barends, and his grandsons, the four sons of Jan, removed from Flatbush to New Jersey. Pieter and Annetje Barends Stryker had eleven children. Jan Stryker, their third child, was born August 6, , and in married Margarita Schenck.

She was baptized June 2, , and married February 17, Her death occurred July 15, , and her husband passed away August 17, He was a member of the Kings County militia. Jan Stryker had nine children by his first wife and five by the second. Pieter Stryker, the eldest child of his first wife, was born September 14, , at Flatbush, Long island, and about married Antje Deremer.

Death summoned him on December 28, He had eleven children by his first wife and one by the second. His son, John Stryker, the eighth child of his first union, was born March 2, , and became captain of the Somerset County militia but was afterwards attached to the state troops. His marriage with Lydia Cornell was solemnized November 13, , and on March 25, , he responded to the final summons.

His wife was born March 15, , and died November 4, John and Lydia Cornell Stryker were the parents of ten children. James I. She was born November 5, , and died about in Cayuga county, New York, while his demise occurred December 14, Their family numbered eight children. Stryker died December 2, , in Vancouver, Washington, and her husband's death occurred in that city on December 21, In their family were four daughters, of whom Alice is the eldest.

By her marriage to Daniel L. Cates she became the mother of four children. The fourth child died in infancy. Cates takes a keen interest in fraternal affairs and is a charter member of The Dalles Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, in which he has filled all of the chairs. In all matters of citizenship he is loyal, progressive and public-spirited and his personal qualities are such as make for popularity.

Clarke Publishing Company - ] Chrisman, Levi No public official of Wasco county enjoys a higher reputation than Levi Chrisman, who has served continuously as sheriff for a period of twenty-two years, and represents the third generation of the family in Oregon. In , when their son Campbell E. Margaret Chrisman there passed away in and her husband remained on the ranch until He then sold the place and came to The Dalles, where he lived retired until his death a few years later.

Campbell E. Chrisman was educated in the public schools of Dayton and remained at home until , when he moved to The Dalles. For a time he leased the ranch near Dufur and about purchased the property. He cultivated the farm until and then sold the tract. Returning to The Dalles, he became a dealer in grain and conducted a grocery and a feed store. Catering to both the wholesale and retail trades, he established a large patronage and continued the business until , when he retired.

He served on the school board and manifested a deep interest in matters touching the welfare and progress of his community. Her parents, John E. Her father was a Christian minister and one of the early circuit riders of Oregon, traveling on horseback to isolated districts in order to spread the Gospel. He passed away early in the '70s and his widow survived him by ten years. The demise of Campbell E.

Chrisman occurred May 15, , at the home of his daughter, Mrs.

The history of Children's Hospital Los Angeles is an ongoing story of how exceptional leaders advance and even transform a community.

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Courtside betting scandal In the family moved to Oregon, first locating at Albany and subsequently taking up their residence at The Dalles. Updating list Brogan entertained about forty friends, from whom they received many beautiful gifts as well as congratulations. Is this restaurant good for local cuisine? Clausen follows diversified farming and has found that the best results are obtained by summer fallowing.
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Football betting tips for today The bitcoins freebsd packages pays three per cent interest on savings accounts and has safe deposit boxes for rent. After robbing the women of their jewelry and taking as much food and clothing as they could lay hands on, the Indians escaped and no one was injured. About five hundred men were at work and in the locks were completed by J. Skip to main content. All photos
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Estonia v georgia bettingexpert twitter After disposing of his mills father worked for a time at his trade gasthof ambrose bettingen aided in constructing the shoe factory in North Dalles. The hospital now served as the principal referral source for critically ill babies and children in the southwestern United States. A pioneer physician, well known to the older residents gasthof ambrose bettingen Wasco county and other sections of the state, was the subject of the following article, written by Fred Lockley for the Oregon Daily Journal of November 27, "A few days ago, while eating breakfast in a restaurant at The Dalles, I saw a man who looked as though he might be a pioneer. Adcox is identified with the Woodmen of the World. As a friend he is valued, as a man he is esteemed, as an attorney he is respected, and as a Judge he is honored and revered. Page Building marked another milestone in the hospital's history of providing the best possible pediatric medicine. As fast as his resources permitted Mr.

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Gasthaus-Restaurant Ambros, Bettingen: See 31 unbiased reviews of Gasthaus-​Restaurant Ambros, rated of 5 on Tripadvisor. St. Ambrose Church. RA-SPC Desoto Street Snelling House Hotel. RA-SPC Smith Anton C. Bettingen House. Marshall Ave. W. On that happy occasion a banquet was held at Hotel Dalles and there Mr. and Mrs. In the party were father's cousin, Ambrose Newton, who brought his wife and Mrs. Sarah Mitchell and her daughters, Mrs. Schenck and Albert Bettingen.