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Football sports betting terms money cryptocurrency wallet wikipedia

Football sports betting terms money

The glossary below contains many of the most commonly-used terms, concepts and strategies that you will see on this site and across sports betting as a whole. Added Game — A game that is not part of the regular Las Vegas rotation. Oftentimes this will be a rescheduled game or the second game of a doubleheader. Against the Spread ATS — Refers to taking or laying points aka the spread as opposed to taking a game straight up.

Arbitrage — The simultaneous purchase and sale of the same game in different markets to profit from unequal prices. Buying Points — Paying an additional fee in order to get a game at a more attractive price. Often times bettors will buy points in football around key numbers such as 3 and 7.

Chalk — The favored team. Contrarian Betting — Also known as betting against the public, contrarian betting finds value by betting on games with lopsided betting percentages. Cover — In sports such as football and basketball, a bettor wins their bet if they cover the point spread.

For example, if you bet a 7-point favorite and they win by nine, you have covered the spread. Dog — Short for underdog, this is the team which bookmakers assume will lose the game. Draw — Also known as a push. If a game falls exactly on the spread, there is no winner and bettors will receive their money back. This will typically refer to an instance where you have a positive expected value. Field — In proposition prop bets, bettors are often allowed to bet the field. This refers to an accumulation of all the teams or players that are not specifically listed.

Future — This refers to bets that come down in advance of an event. For example, one can bet a Super Bowl future prior to the beginning of the season by selecting which team s they believe will win the championship. A bettor receives payment at the end of the season if their selection did claim the title. Hedging — Placing bets on the opposite side after you have already placed a wager on one side. This can be used to either cut your losses, or guarantee a profit. Hook — In spread based sports, the hook is an extra half-point that bettors can get.

Oftentimes in football, bettors will buy the hook around key numbers like 3 to get a line of 3. Juice — This is the tax that sportsbooks create for placing a wager. Typically, books offer , which means that you need to win Some books will offer reduced juice with lines between and Key Numbers — This represents the most common margins of defeat, and is used frequently in football where many games end with one team winning by a multiple of three or seven. Middle — This occurs when you bet on both sides of a game and have an opportunity to win both bets.

Instead, these sports offer a moneyline in which you bet on whether or not a specific team is going to win straight-up. Off the Board — A game or event that sportsbooks will not allow you to bet on. If both teams combine to score more than the total, the over wins. If they combine to score fewer, the under wins. Parlay — When a bettor makes multiple bets at least two and ties them together, you need multiple events to all win for higher payouts.

This is a risky proposition, but potentially very lucrative. In spread based sports like basketball or football, this is a line of 0. Prop Bet — A bet on something other than the outcome of a game. Odds and the number of points available to "tease" vary from casino to casino. To bet on boxing, tell the ticket writer the bet number of the boxer you wish to bet and the amount you wish to wager. Boxing odds are shown using a "Money Line.

A "minus" - preceding the number indicates a favorite. Tyson is favored to win the bout. Boxing matches often feature money line proposition wagers on knockouts, draws, rounds and the duration of the fight. Odds vary on each fight. To bet on football, tell the ticket writer the bet number of the team you wish to bet, with the point spread and the amount you wish to wager.

The point spread: When betting on football, the team you bet on must "cover the spread. If you bet the Dolphins, the Dolphins must win by 7 points for you to win your bet. If you bet the Jets, any of the following will declare you a winner. The listed point spread at the time you make your bet may be different from the point spread when the game starts.

In some cases, bettors have the option to discard the point spread and bet on which team will win. This is called betting on the "Money Line". Sports books offer a number of different cards, each one having different rules. Rules for parlay cards are placed on the back of each card. Read them carefully before wagering. The cards are simple to fill out. Simply darken the boxes, or circles, that apply to the teams you wish to parlay. Then darken the amount you want to bet.

Sportsbooks offer bettors the opportunity to wager on the outcome of a season -- for example, which team will win the Super Bowl or the Stanley Cup or the American League East pennant. This is known as "futures book" or "future book" betting.

As an illustration, let's look at Super Bowl futures. For example, the Ravens may be , the Redskins , the Cardinals , etc. It does not matter whether your team covers the point spread in the Super Bowl. For the purposes of future book betting, the team has to win only the Super Bowl. When you make a futures bet, your odds are "locked in. Futures betting also is offered on the major events in horse racing, such as the Kentucky Derby and Breeders' Cup. In horse racing futures, if your horse does not start the race due to injury or any other reason, you lose the bet -- there are no refunds.

On the other hand, the odds on your horse racing futures bet also are "locked in," regardless of the horse's odds on race day. Some sportsbooks offer futures betting on unusual propositions, such as which major league baseball player will hit the most home runs in the regular season. Note that in this type of wager, all bets are action regardless of injuries or other unforeseen events.

This type of wager is typically found on pro football and major league baseball, and sometimes on pro basketball. If the Yankees go on to win 94 or more games, the "over" is a winner. If they win 92 or fewer games, the "under" is a winner.

If they win exactly 93, the bet is a push and tickets are refunded. Among Las Vegas gamblers, golf is considered one of the two fastest-growing sports to bet on auto racing is the other. The most basic form of golf betting involves picking the winner of a tournament. Typically a sports book will list 30 or more individual golfers along with a field all others option, at various odds. Another popular form of golf betting involves matchup propositions, in which two golfers are paired against each other in a head-to-head wager, with a betting line on each golfer set by the oddsmaker.

The golfer with the better lower score wins the matchup. If one golfer continues play in the tournament after his opponent misses the cut, the golfer who continues play wins the matchup. For example, a matchup may pit Lehman minus against Jim Furyk plus Some matchups pit one usually very good golfer against two or more others.

To determine the winner, take Woods' score and compare with to the best lowest score recorded by the three others. If he finishes first, second or third in the tournament, the "under" wins; if he finishes fourth or worse, the "over" tickets cash. Rules vary by casino, but usually your golfer must tee off in the tournament for "action" meaning once he tees off, you will either win or lose your bet.

If for some reason he does not tee off, this is usually considered "no action" and tickets are refunded. To bet on hockey, tell the ticket writer the bet number of the team you wish to bet and the amount you wish to wager. If your team covers the goal spread, you win. The payout is based on a "Money Line". When betting on hockey, the team you bet on must "cover the spread. The Red Wings must win the game by at least two goals to be a winner.

If you bet on the Sharks, you win your bet if: a The Sharks win the game. Note: The money line is used in conjunction with the point spread. All teams must win to win the bet. Hockey parlays are figured out by calculating the payout for the first game, based on the money line, then applying that amount to the next game and so forth. Thanks to satellite feeds from racetracks around the nation, Las Vegas is a sort of nirvana for horse racing bettors or "horseplayers," as they are sometimes called.

Because there are so many tracks to choose from, in Las Vegas race books it is usually necessary to identify which track you want when you place your bet. For example, tell the ticket writer, "Churchill Downs, eighth race, five dollars to win on No. Otherwise, betting procedure in the race book is the same as at the track: For you to collect on a "win" bet your horse must win the race, to collect on a "place" bet he must finish first or second, and to collect on a "show" bet he must finish first, second or third.

Betting a horse "across the board" is really three separate bets: one to win, one to place and one to show. Hitting an "exacta" entails picking the first two finishers in a race in the correct order; a "quinella" is the first two finishers in either order. A "trifecta" is the first three finishers in exact order; a "trifecta box" is the first three in any order.

A "superfecta" is the first four finishers in exacta order. A "daily double" is a wager that calls for picking the winners of two consecutive races. A "daily triple" entails picking the winners of three consecutive races. And a "Pick Six" calls for picking the winners of six consecutive races, an extremely difficult feat that is usually rewarded with an enormous payout.

In Las Vegas, race books frequently offer promotions such as free contests with cash prizes, special house-banked betting pools that grow larger if no one hits them for a few days or horse racing tournaments. Rules and details vary greatly by casino so be sure to shop around to find those that appeal to you.

Nevada sportsbooks are not permitted to accept wagers on presidential elections, the Academy Awards or the winner of the TV show "Survivor. They are not real betting lines. Under state law, wagers must involve the outcome of "athletic contests" rather than elections or votes of any kind. Even so, "wacky" proposition bets can sometimes be found in Las Vegas sportsbooks. They are often linked to the Super Bowl or another major sporting event. For instance, in Super Bowl XXXV gamblers could bet on whether the Ravens would score more touchdowns than the Chicago Blackhawks scored goals on Super Bowl Sunday -- and that was just one of countless "wacky" propositions.

As another example, to generate interest in Monday Night NFL games, many sportsbooks offer odds on which player will score the first touchdown in the game. These "wacky" bets can be lots of fun, but odds and details vary tremendously by casino, so read the fine print before getting involved.

The toolbar contains the following The AudioEye Help Desk to report accessibility and usability related issues. Please click here if you are not redirected within a few seconds. Search Las Vegas Shows Start date. End date. This guide is provided for informational purposes only. This is not a betting site. Auto racing Betting on auto racing has exploded in popularity in Vegas in recent years, and its appeal continues to grow.

Driver Odds Jeff Gordon Jeff Burton Casey Atwood Auto racing matchup propositions also are available, in which two drivers are paired against each other in a head-to-head wager, with a betting line on each driver set by the oddsmaker. Baseball To bet on baseball, tell the ticket writer the bet number of the team you wish to bet and the amount you wish to wager.

Example: Pitcher listed is starting pitcher Bet Num. You have just seen an example of a dime line. Braves Dodgers Braves Dodgers Even You can arrive at the underdog's price by looking at the favorite's line.

Total: Total runs scored in a game. Example: Bet Num. Baseball Parlays You may combine several teams into one wager. Listed pitcher s option When making a baseball bet, you are betting team vs.

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Fold A fold indicates the number of selections in an accumulator e. Form Past performances used to give an indication of the team's chances. Form Player A punter who makes selections from past performance often via a computer based system.

Futures Odds offered on winners of sporting events in advance of the event itself see Ante Post. Goliath A multiple consisting of bets 28 doubles, 56 trebles, 70 4-folds, 56 5-folds, 28 6-folds, 8 7-folds and 1 8-fold involving 8 selections in different events. Handicap A method used by bookmakers to make a one-sided event become a more attractive betting proposition.

Teams are awarded a number of points based on their calibre also known as the "pointspread" or "line". Hang Cheng Asian Handicap Form of soccer betting esp. More on Handicap bets. Heinz A multiple bet consisting of 57 bets 15 doubles, 20 trebles, 15 4-folds, 6 5-folds and 1 6-fold involving 6 teams in different matches.

Juice The commission paid to the bookmaker also known as overround. More on vig, Juice, bookie margin. Odds The bookmaker's view of the chance of a team winning or event happening adjusted to include a profit. Odds-on Where the odds are shorter than evens eg "4 to 6".

If the selection wins, the amount won is less than the amount staked don't forget, you get your stake back as well! Outsider Long shot also known as "The Rag". Overround Profit margin in the bookmaker's favour. More on Overround. Parlay Term for an accumulator bet in US. Also, a wager on two or more teams in which both must win or "cover" for the bet to be lucrative. Patent A multiple bet consisting of 7 bets involving 3 selections in different events.

A single on each selection, plus 3 doubles and 1 treble. Permutations It is possible to "perm" bets or selections e. Picks Also known as "tips", picks are the recommended bets from an "expert". Pointspread The start that the favourite gives the underdog. Also known as the "line" or "handicap". Teaser A pointspread based bet where the punter can move the line in his favour in return for reduced odds.

Tips The selections recommended by an expert to bet on also known as "picks". Tipster A person who makes recommendation on the outcome of matches to punters. Treble A bet consisting of 3 selections, all of which must win for the wager to be successful. Trixie A multiple bet consisting of 4 bets 3 doubles and 1 treble with 3 selections in different events.

Turf Accountant A bookmaker. Underdog The team that receives a point start in a handicap. An unlikely winner. A long shot. Push When neither side wins the game. A tie. All money will be returned to the bettors. Roundabout A wager consisting of 3 bets involving 3 selections in different events i. Round Robin A bet consisting of 10 bets 3 pairs of "single stake" bets plus 3 doubles and 1 treble involving three selections in different events.

Shoo In A supposed cinch bet or guaranteed victor. Also, a fixed outcome. Single A "straight" bet on one selection to win. The simplest bet to place and the most common. Returns or losses are calculated in proportion to how right or wrong the punter is, and can lead to huge returns or huge losses.

Spreads Also known as handicaps. Sure Thing Any bet that has very little chance of losing. System A method of betting, usually mathematically based, used by a punter to try for an advantage. Value Getting the best odds on a wager. Vigorish The bookmaker's commission also known as "vig" or "juice". Winning Margin A bet to predict the winning margin of one team over another. Middle : Cashing tickets on both sides of a betting option.

Bettors have an opportunity to middle when a point spread moves up or down prior to a match. The MLB draft is five rounds and most of the players selected will be assigned to minor league teams. Moneyline : A straight up bet, without any point spread, where bettors need to predict the outright winner.

Multiple bets: Same as parlay, multiple bets are a single wager that consists of at least two sides on a single ticket. All sides must win or push to cash winning multiple bets. MVP: Player honored as most valuable to their team during the regular season or playoffs. Wagering on who will be named the Most Valuable Player is a popular futures betting option in professional sports. Nap: Similar to a lock, a nap is a handicappers suggested best bet on a daily betting card.

No action: Betting options cancelled by a bookmaker are graded as no action. Original stakes are returned to bettors. Novelty bets: Prop and special betting options that are wagers beyond standard moneyline, point spread and game total odds. Team and player propositions are the most common novelty bets. Odds: Betting lines set by a bookmaker on a variety of events. Oddsmaker: Same as a linemaker, a person or group that sets daily betting lines and prices.

Odds on favorite: One side that is viewed as far superior to the other and is priced with odds that offer very little value. Odds shopping: Reviewing the lines at a variety of sportsbooks in order to find the best priced odds.

An injury to a star player may cause bookmakers to pull odds off the board. Outright betting: Predicting the overall winner of a tournament or playoff competition. Over bet: Opposite of an Under bet on game total options. Bettors need to determine if the combined scores of both teams will go over or remain under the number.

Also known as game total odds. Parlay : A single bet, also known as an accumulator or multiple, that consists of two or more sides. Each side must win to produce a winning ticket. Parlay banker: Forming the base of a parlay wager, a banker is a favorite side to which other sides are added. Payout: The amount a bettor collects on a winning wager. When a wager is placed, the possible payout on a betting receipt usually includes the original stake.

Held in late May at various courses across the United States. Point spread : Odds posted on a match that are designed to level the playing field. Favorites are listed with a negative Post time: Scheduled start time of a race. Power rankings: A ranking system that uses a variety of criteria to grade teams, in a specific league, from the best to worst. Preakness Stakes: Second jewel in the Triple Crown of thoroughbred racing. Proposition bet: Often shortened to prop bet, proposition bets are exotic or special wagers that are offered on most sporting events.

NFL Super Bowl prop betting options number in the hundreds. Proxy : A proxy is an individual, or a group of individuals, who place bets for other people. The term is most commonly associated with people who submit picks for non-Las Vegas residents that are involved in season-long sports pools like the Westgate Las Vegas SuperContest.

Puck line: Point spread pricing in hockey. Prior to a match, the favorite is normally posted at Push: Any wager where the final result is a tie. If a basketball spread is 11 points and the final score is spread bets on both teams are graded as a push and original stakes are returned. Quarter Bet : Any wager placed prior to or during any quarter of a sporting event.

Prior to an NBA game, Boston may be a LIVE betting odds will change often as the first 12 minutes of the match play out. Recreational Bettor: A player that bets infrequently or on major sporting events only. Rec player bets are counted as public money. Opposite of a sharp or professional bettor. Rotation Number: A number assigned by bookmakers to every betting option on the board.

Bettors use the rotation number when placing a bet, rather than team names, at betting windows at land based sportsbooks. ROY: Honors the top first year player in most professional sports leagues. Wagering on which player will be named the Rookie of the Year ROY is a popular futures betting option. Run Line: Point spread pricing in baseball. Prior to a game the favorite is normally posted at Second half bet: Any wager that focuses on the outcome of the second half of any competition.

Bettors can place wagers before the second half begins or make live bets once the match resumes. Selke Trophy: Awarded to a forward not a defenseman or goaltender with the best defensive skills during the NHL regular season. Sell points: Bettors can sell points by using alternate point spreads and game totals. In football, if a player moves a line from Juice becomes more favorable for the bettor with each point sold. Sharp: A professional sports gambler who uses vast resources to determine their wagers.

Sharps look at the big picture and base their bets on knowledge. Pro bettors always shop around for the best prices and will bet on favorites or underdogs when they receive proper value. Special: Similar to prop and exotic wagers, special bets are added to a competition beyond the more common moneyline, game total and spread betting options.

The Rams need to defeat the Giants by at least eight points to cash a winning ticket. Bettors lay the spread with favorites and take the spread with underdogs. Sportsbook : A free standing shop, or in dedicated space at land based casinos, sportsbooks have become popular meeting spots for bettors and sports fans alike.

Sportsbooks accept bets on US events, plus action from around the globe, and provide giant screens for bettors to watch the action play out. Square: Another term for a novice or recreational player and the opposite of a sharp or professional bettor. Stake: The amount of money a bettor risks when placing a bet. Original stakes are returned on all winning wagers and many bets that are graded as a push. Staking method: Differs from bettor to bettor. Some players set maximum stake limits on each bet they place while others use a bankroll percentage as their stake.

Steam : Odds that change quickly usually due to a large amount of betting action by sharp bettors or syndicates. Straight bet: A single wager on moneyline, spread or game total betting options. Syndicate: A group of bettors that pool funds and use their combined knowledge to bet on events. Syndicates will often wager large amounts to move a line and then place an even larger bet on the new price they helped create.

Taking points: A bet placed on an underdog side. Tickets cash is the Nationals win outright or lose by one run. Teaser odds : Any line moved up or down by a bookmaker to entice tease bettors. Players can tease odds on a single game by using alternate lines. They can also place a parlay bet from a teaser card issued by a sportsbook. Teaser Card: A daily list of all games, from one specific sport, where the odds are higher or lower than the prices posted on the main betting board. Teaser card bets require selecting two or more sides.

Tip: Betting advice offered by tipsters and handicappers that suggest the most likely outcome of an event. Tips should never be bet on blindly but can be helpful when used with a proper pregame research plan. Tipster: A person or group that offers betting advice.

Some tipsters offer free sports wagering advice while others charge a fee for their tips. Held annually in late July at a golf course in the United Kingdom. Also commonly known as The Open or the British Open. Three-way odds : Wagering options that have three sides and include ties as a betting option. Two-way odds: Wagering options that have two sides and do not include ties as a betting option. Under: Opposite of Over on game total betting. If the total on a Lakers vs. Clippers match is set at , players who place under bets need the combined final score to be points or less.

Underdog: Perceived to be the inferior side, underdogs are posted with a positive number. Open Golf : Third of four major Grand Slam golf tournaments that is played in the late June at various golf courses in the United States. Vigorish: Another term for juice. Wise Guy: Handicappers, sharps and professional bettors with vast knowledge of the sports they bet on. Benintendi, a first-round pick in , played for the Red Sox for five seasons and was a key piece of Boston's World Series championship.

Trae Young was not given a foul call on the final play of the game as the Mavericks beat the Hawks, Britt Reid, son of Chiefs head coach Andy Reid, was placed on administrative leave following a car accident that left a child critically injured. A bloody hunt.

A ghastly attack. And a state divided on what to do about the black bears that humans encounter hundreds of times per year. Home Gambling. A Accumulator: A parlay bet in North America, accumulator wagers consist of two or more selections and each side must win or push to create a winning ticket.

Book: Short for a bookmaker or sportsbook that posts odds and accepts bets. Bookie: Short for a bookmaker. Chalk bettor: A player that bets on favorites with the majority of their wagers Circled game: Matches that have set betting maximums, which are capped at low amounts. E Each-way: Common in horse racing, each-way betting takes a single amount and splits it on a horse to finish first or second. F Favorite: Any side priced with a negative number.

H Half ball handicap: Soccer betting odds where 0. I If bet: A member of the parlay family, an If Bet consists of two or more wagers. J Joint favorite: Two or more sides posted with the same betting odds on the same event. N Nap: Similar to a lock, a nap is a handicappers suggested best bet on a daily betting card.

O Odds: Betting lines set by a bookmaker on a variety of events. P Parlay : A single bet, also known as an accumulator or multiple, that consists of two or more sides. Public money: Amount wagered by the general public on any betting option. Q Quarter Bet : Any wager placed prior to or during any quarter of a sporting event.

R Recreational Bettor: A player that bets infrequently or on major sporting events only. S Second half bet: Any wager that focuses on the outcome of the second half of any competition. T Taking points: A bet placed on an underdog side. Ticket: A receipt issued by a bookmaker to confirm a wager has been accepted. U Under: Opposite of Over on game total betting.

W Wager: Placing a bet on any event offered at a sportsbook, casino or racebook. By Nick Selbe. By Madeline Coleman. More Sports. By Brian Burnsed.

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Bonus — Sportsbooks offer a financial bonus to customers for a variety of reasons. A signup bonus is the most popular way to incentivize bettors to use a certain sportsbook. Chalk — A term for the team that is the favorite in an event. This team or player is usually a big favorite. The chalk is the expected winner by a large margin. Circle Game — A game is circled by a sportsbook because betting limits are lower than usual.

Closing Line — This is simply where the point spread is when the game begins. Closing Line Value — This term is used by bettors to measure the value of the line they wagered before the line that was the last available before a game begins. Consensus — The general agreement about something. In sports betting consensus could be the most popular teams bet or line available for a game. Contrarian — Betting against the trends of the mainstream popular opinions.

Bettors usually place contrarian wagers when there is value on the opposite opinion. Dead Heat — Another way to say that there is a tie in a finishing position. Sportsbooks have different rules on how to pay in the event of a tie or dead heat in an event. Decimal Odds — This is a different way to present odds than Americans are used to.

The math is easier to figure out for most bettors than US moneyline odds. Decimal odds are derived from a simple calculation of the amount bet x odds. For example, Vegas Golden Knights vs. The difference of 10 dime line is the traditional profit margin for sportsbooks.

Double Chance — This is a European sports betting term mostly used for soccer betting. A double chance wager allows the bettor two opportunities to win a bet. For example, a result in soccer can be a win, loss, or tie. A double chance bettor may combine two of the three results instead of just one. This gives the bettor twice the chance to win the wager. Double Pop — A European way of saying that a bettor will bet twice the normal amount. In the US this is known more often as doubling up.

Early Cash Out — A way for bettors to settle a wager for a certain dollar amount before the event is over. This is a way to lock in a profit at a smaller value than the wager would ultimately pay. Even Money — A wager that pays the same as was risked. Exacta — Choosing horses to finish first and second in a race.

This is sometimes, but rarely, offered for other competitive sports. Exotic Wager — These are non-traditional sports bets. This kind of wager is often listed as a prop bet in a sportsbook. Expected Value — This is a calculation used by a bettor to determine whether a wager should win or lose over time.

Positive expected value EV bets over time is a good way to become a winning sports bettor. Exposure — The amount of money a sportsbook potentially could lose for a specific event. For example, sportsbooks might have a lot of exposure money at risk on one team winning a championship versus another.

First Half — A derivative bet that can be placed on a sport that has two halves. Football and basketball are the most popular sports to place a first half wager. Fixed Odds — These are the odds that most sports bettors will experience. Horse bettors might experience a change in odds from parimutuel betting. Flat Betting — Simply put, this is a betting system where all wagers are the same. The wager is usually a percentage of bankroll but could also be a fixed dollar amount.

Fractional Odds — Another kind of odds used mainly in Britain and Ireland. Some sportsbooks may offer derivative versions for home, away, or periods of games during the day. Some sportsbooks may offer a similar bet for runs in Major League Baseball. Handicapper — A person who analyzes sports events to predict the winning team or player. Handle — The amount of money a sportsbook or sportsbooks take from wagers.

This could be broken down by sport, region, casinos, and more. Hedge — Hedging is a strategy used by sports bettors to either reduce the risk of or to guarantee a profit from a wager. Home Field — This the field court, rink, etc.

Hook — Another way to say half of a point. For example, a team may be a 3. Joint Favorite — When there are two favorites for an event. This is mostly used in England. Kelly Criterion — A popular bankroll management strategy for a bettor who seeks to limit losses while maximizing the amount won. Layoff — When a bookmaker reduces the risk of losing wagers by placing a bet with a different sportsbook s. This typically happens when there is lopsided wagering on one side of a game and the sportsbook or a bookie want to alleviate potential losses.

Listed Pitcher — This is a baseball bet that is active only if the pitcher listed as the starter throws the first pitch of a game. This is also known as In Play wagering. Lock — Another way of saying that a team or player will be an easy winner. Margin — This is a wager where a bettor selects a team to win or lose by a specific number of points regardless of the point spread.

The Raiders must win by 11, 12, or 13 points for a win. A victory by 10 or 14 points is a push. Martingale System — A gambling system where bettors doubles the amount of a wager after losses. This system can be used for sports and other forms of gambling i.

This gives a bettor multiple chances to win wagers on the same game. Matched Bet — When a bettor uses free wagers from a sportsbook operator to increase potential profit. This is a popular technique employed in new legal US sports betting markets as promotional offers are available. Novelty Bet — Placing a wager on a non-sports event with a sportsbook.

For example, placing a wager on the Oscars in New Jersey. These kinds of wagers are more popular overseas. However, if you list starting pitchers, and your pitcher doesn't start, then the bet is refunded. To bet on basketball, tell the ticket writer the bet number of the team you wish to bet, with the point spread, and the amount you wish to wager.

The Point Spread: When betting on basketball, the team you bet on must "cover the spread. The point spread is always placed to the immediate right of the team that is favored. In this example, if you bet the Bulls, the Bulls must win by 4 points for you to win your bet. If you bet the Lakers, any of the following will declare you a winner. If the Bulls win by exactly 3 points then the wager is declared a push and all money is refunded.

Point spreads change constantly. The listed point spread the time you make your bet may be different from the point spread when the game starts. The point spread that is listed on your ticket is your official spread. It makes no difference which team covers the spread. Simply add the final score of each team.

You may combine several teams into one wager. Odds and the number of teams vary from casino to casino. The following are approximate odds:. Any game that results in a push reduces the parlay one team. A two-team parlay would become a straight bet. This increases the probability of winning your bet but decreases the odds of the parlay.

Odds and the number of points available to "tease" vary from casino to casino. To bet on boxing, tell the ticket writer the bet number of the boxer you wish to bet and the amount you wish to wager. Boxing odds are shown using a "Money Line. A "minus" - preceding the number indicates a favorite.

Tyson is favored to win the bout. Boxing matches often feature money line proposition wagers on knockouts, draws, rounds and the duration of the fight. Odds vary on each fight. To bet on football, tell the ticket writer the bet number of the team you wish to bet, with the point spread and the amount you wish to wager.

The point spread: When betting on football, the team you bet on must "cover the spread. If you bet the Dolphins, the Dolphins must win by 7 points for you to win your bet. If you bet the Jets, any of the following will declare you a winner. The listed point spread at the time you make your bet may be different from the point spread when the game starts.

In some cases, bettors have the option to discard the point spread and bet on which team will win. This is called betting on the "Money Line". Sports books offer a number of different cards, each one having different rules. Rules for parlay cards are placed on the back of each card. Read them carefully before wagering.

The cards are simple to fill out. Simply darken the boxes, or circles, that apply to the teams you wish to parlay. Then darken the amount you want to bet. Sportsbooks offer bettors the opportunity to wager on the outcome of a season -- for example, which team will win the Super Bowl or the Stanley Cup or the American League East pennant. This is known as "futures book" or "future book" betting. As an illustration, let's look at Super Bowl futures.

For example, the Ravens may be , the Redskins , the Cardinals , etc. It does not matter whether your team covers the point spread in the Super Bowl. For the purposes of future book betting, the team has to win only the Super Bowl. When you make a futures bet, your odds are "locked in. Futures betting also is offered on the major events in horse racing, such as the Kentucky Derby and Breeders' Cup.

In horse racing futures, if your horse does not start the race due to injury or any other reason, you lose the bet -- there are no refunds. On the other hand, the odds on your horse racing futures bet also are "locked in," regardless of the horse's odds on race day. Some sportsbooks offer futures betting on unusual propositions, such as which major league baseball player will hit the most home runs in the regular season.

Note that in this type of wager, all bets are action regardless of injuries or other unforeseen events. This type of wager is typically found on pro football and major league baseball, and sometimes on pro basketball. If the Yankees go on to win 94 or more games, the "over" is a winner.

If they win 92 or fewer games, the "under" is a winner. If they win exactly 93, the bet is a push and tickets are refunded. Among Las Vegas gamblers, golf is considered one of the two fastest-growing sports to bet on auto racing is the other. The most basic form of golf betting involves picking the winner of a tournament. Typically a sports book will list 30 or more individual golfers along with a field all others option, at various odds.

Another popular form of golf betting involves matchup propositions, in which two golfers are paired against each other in a head-to-head wager, with a betting line on each golfer set by the oddsmaker. The golfer with the better lower score wins the matchup.

If one golfer continues play in the tournament after his opponent misses the cut, the golfer who continues play wins the matchup. For example, a matchup may pit Lehman minus against Jim Furyk plus Some matchups pit one usually very good golfer against two or more others.

To determine the winner, take Woods' score and compare with to the best lowest score recorded by the three others. If he finishes first, second or third in the tournament, the "under" wins; if he finishes fourth or worse, the "over" tickets cash. Rules vary by casino, but usually your golfer must tee off in the tournament for "action" meaning once he tees off, you will either win or lose your bet.

If for some reason he does not tee off, this is usually considered "no action" and tickets are refunded. To bet on hockey, tell the ticket writer the bet number of the team you wish to bet and the amount you wish to wager. If your team covers the goal spread, you win. The payout is based on a "Money Line". When betting on hockey, the team you bet on must "cover the spread. The Red Wings must win the game by at least two goals to be a winner.

If you bet on the Sharks, you win your bet if: a The Sharks win the game. Note: The money line is used in conjunction with the point spread. All teams must win to win the bet. Hockey parlays are figured out by calculating the payout for the first game, based on the money line, then applying that amount to the next game and so forth. Thanks to satellite feeds from racetracks around the nation, Las Vegas is a sort of nirvana for horse racing bettors or "horseplayers," as they are sometimes called.

Because there are so many tracks to choose from, in Las Vegas race books it is usually necessary to identify which track you want when you place your bet. For example, tell the ticket writer, "Churchill Downs, eighth race, five dollars to win on No. Otherwise, betting procedure in the race book is the same as at the track: For you to collect on a "win" bet your horse must win the race, to collect on a "place" bet he must finish first or second, and to collect on a "show" bet he must finish first, second or third.

Betting a horse "across the board" is really three separate bets: one to win, one to place and one to show. Hitting an "exacta" entails picking the first two finishers in a race in the correct order; a "quinella" is the first two finishers in either order. A "trifecta" is the first three finishers in exact order; a "trifecta box" is the first three in any order.

A "superfecta" is the first four finishers in exacta order. A "daily double" is a wager that calls for picking the winners of two consecutive races. A "daily triple" entails picking the winners of three consecutive races. And a "Pick Six" calls for picking the winners of six consecutive races, an extremely difficult feat that is usually rewarded with an enormous payout. In Las Vegas, race books frequently offer promotions such as free contests with cash prizes, special house-banked betting pools that grow larger if no one hits them for a few days or horse racing tournaments.

Rules and details vary greatly by casino so be sure to shop around to find those that appeal to you. Nevada sportsbooks are not permitted to accept wagers on presidential elections, the Academy Awards or the winner of the TV show "Survivor. They are not real betting lines. Under state law, wagers must involve the outcome of "athletic contests" rather than elections or votes of any kind. Even so, "wacky" proposition bets can sometimes be found in Las Vegas sportsbooks. They are often linked to the Super Bowl or another major sporting event.

For instance, in Super Bowl XXXV gamblers could bet on whether the Ravens would score more touchdowns than the Chicago Blackhawks scored goals on Super Bowl Sunday -- and that was just one of countless "wacky" propositions.

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Draw — Also known as a push. If a game falls exactly on the spread, there is no winner and bettors will receive their money back. This will typically refer to an instance where you have a positive expected value. Field — In proposition prop bets, bettors are often allowed to bet the field. This refers to an accumulation of all the teams or players that are not specifically listed. Future — This refers to bets that come down in advance of an event. For example, one can bet a Super Bowl future prior to the beginning of the season by selecting which team s they believe will win the championship.

A bettor receives payment at the end of the season if their selection did claim the title. Hedging — Placing bets on the opposite side after you have already placed a wager on one side. This can be used to either cut your losses, or guarantee a profit. Hook — In spread based sports, the hook is an extra half-point that bettors can get. Oftentimes in football, bettors will buy the hook around key numbers like 3 to get a line of 3.

Juice — This is the tax that sportsbooks create for placing a wager. Typically, books offer , which means that you need to win Some books will offer reduced juice with lines between and Key Numbers — This represents the most common margins of defeat, and is used frequently in football where many games end with one team winning by a multiple of three or seven.

Middle — This occurs when you bet on both sides of a game and have an opportunity to win both bets. Instead, these sports offer a moneyline in which you bet on whether or not a specific team is going to win straight-up. Off the Board — A game or event that sportsbooks will not allow you to bet on. If both teams combine to score more than the total, the over wins. If they combine to score fewer, the under wins. Parlay — When a bettor makes multiple bets at least two and ties them together, you need multiple events to all win for higher payouts.

This is a risky proposition, but potentially very lucrative. In spread based sports like basketball or football, this is a line of 0. Prop Bet — A bet on something other than the outcome of a game. Public Betting Percentage — Also referred to as public betting trends, we offer real betting percentages from seven contributing sportsbooks.

These numbers represent real bets placed at real sportsbooks. These percentages are integral for our betting against the public philosophy. Push — When a contest ends without a winner. In a moneyline sport this happens if the game ended in a tie. In a spread sport, this happens if the favorite wins by the exact spread. Real Time Odds — Live lines that update immediately as sportsbooks adjust their lines.

Reverse-Line Movement — Betting line movement that contradicts the public betting percentages. This indicates that sharp money is taking Team B. This alternative allows you to add runs for the underdog, or subtract them from the favorite. This means that a favorite has to win by at least two runs for you to win your bet, while an underdog could either lose by one run or win straight-up to win the bet. The benefit of this is that you can bet more lucrative lines on favorites, but because baseball and hockey are such low-scoring games, this can be a risky proposition.

Decimal odds are derived from a simple calculation of the amount bet x odds. For example, Vegas Golden Knights vs. The difference of 10 dime line is the traditional profit margin for sportsbooks. Double Chance — This is a European sports betting term mostly used for soccer betting.

A double chance wager allows the bettor two opportunities to win a bet. For example, a result in soccer can be a win, loss, or tie. A double chance bettor may combine two of the three results instead of just one. This gives the bettor twice the chance to win the wager. Double Pop — A European way of saying that a bettor will bet twice the normal amount. In the US this is known more often as doubling up.

Early Cash Out — A way for bettors to settle a wager for a certain dollar amount before the event is over. This is a way to lock in a profit at a smaller value than the wager would ultimately pay. Even Money — A wager that pays the same as was risked. Exacta — Choosing horses to finish first and second in a race. This is sometimes, but rarely, offered for other competitive sports. Exotic Wager — These are non-traditional sports bets.

This kind of wager is often listed as a prop bet in a sportsbook. Expected Value — This is a calculation used by a bettor to determine whether a wager should win or lose over time. Positive expected value EV bets over time is a good way to become a winning sports bettor. Exposure — The amount of money a sportsbook potentially could lose for a specific event. For example, sportsbooks might have a lot of exposure money at risk on one team winning a championship versus another.

First Half — A derivative bet that can be placed on a sport that has two halves. Football and basketball are the most popular sports to place a first half wager. Fixed Odds — These are the odds that most sports bettors will experience.

Horse bettors might experience a change in odds from parimutuel betting. Flat Betting — Simply put, this is a betting system where all wagers are the same. The wager is usually a percentage of bankroll but could also be a fixed dollar amount. Fractional Odds — Another kind of odds used mainly in Britain and Ireland.

Some sportsbooks may offer derivative versions for home, away, or periods of games during the day. Some sportsbooks may offer a similar bet for runs in Major League Baseball. Handicapper — A person who analyzes sports events to predict the winning team or player. Handle — The amount of money a sportsbook or sportsbooks take from wagers. This could be broken down by sport, region, casinos, and more. Hedge — Hedging is a strategy used by sports bettors to either reduce the risk of or to guarantee a profit from a wager.

Home Field — This the field court, rink, etc. Hook — Another way to say half of a point. For example, a team may be a 3. Joint Favorite — When there are two favorites for an event. This is mostly used in England. Kelly Criterion — A popular bankroll management strategy for a bettor who seeks to limit losses while maximizing the amount won. Layoff — When a bookmaker reduces the risk of losing wagers by placing a bet with a different sportsbook s. This typically happens when there is lopsided wagering on one side of a game and the sportsbook or a bookie want to alleviate potential losses.

Listed Pitcher — This is a baseball bet that is active only if the pitcher listed as the starter throws the first pitch of a game. This is also known as In Play wagering. Lock — Another way of saying that a team or player will be an easy winner.

Margin — This is a wager where a bettor selects a team to win or lose by a specific number of points regardless of the point spread. The Raiders must win by 11, 12, or 13 points for a win. A victory by 10 or 14 points is a push. Martingale System — A gambling system where bettors doubles the amount of a wager after losses. This system can be used for sports and other forms of gambling i. This gives a bettor multiple chances to win wagers on the same game.

Matched Bet — When a bettor uses free wagers from a sportsbook operator to increase potential profit. This is a popular technique employed in new legal US sports betting markets as promotional offers are available. Novelty Bet — Placing a wager on a non-sports event with a sportsbook. For example, placing a wager on the Oscars in New Jersey.

These kinds of wagers are more popular overseas. Odds-on Favorite — When a team or person is heavily favored to win a game or event. They often have very low odds paying much less than the amount wagered. Off the Board — When a sportsbook stops taking wagers on an event or participant they remove the game odds from the betting board.

This often happens when a player is uncertain to participate because of an injury. Public Betting Percentage — This is the percentage of wagers placed by the general betting public. Puck Line — This is a point spread of sorts based on goals scored during a hockey game. The base puck line for a game is often plus or minus 1. Sportsbooks might offer an alternative puck line with more or fewer goals scored. Push — When a point spread wager lands exactly on the line offered by the sportsbook.

The bettor receives their money back if they push. If they win by exactly 14 points, the wager pushes and the bettor gets their original wager back. Player Props — A player prop bet is a wager on an individual player to do something during a game. For example, which player will score first in a football game? Power Ranking — AKA Power Rating — Creating a ranking score for each team so that a bettor, handicapper, or sportsbook can create a point spread.

Experienced handicappers use their point spreads to compare with a sportsbook in order to find the best bets available. Reduced Juice — When a sportsbook lowers the vig on a game.